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    well I gotta give to whoever flagged that or whatever, that tweet wasn’t just immature rant against the two party system, was a deeply misogynist tweet.

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      Yeah, the whole post is a thinly-veiled excuse to say an awful misogynist thing again, under the guise of pretending he would never say that awful misogynist thing again, and oh btw twitter has a responsibility to show this awful thing he would never say again to more people than it already showed it to. So even though he’s “grown” and would never say this again, he thinks twitter should say it again and again forever on his behalf. What a cowardly perspective.

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        I don’t know the author’s cultural background, but that’s not universal. Scottish Twitter (and Scotland for instance) have quite different norms.

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          Based on the author’s own About page, his cultural background is American.

          I started Fight the Future to help spread awareness for topics the deeply concern me and that I hope would deeply concern American (sic!) and the world.

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              No, just that words have different valences in different cultures. The movie title Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me sounds very different in London, for instance. I was there around the time it was released.

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                Sure, I get that, and valences change over time as well.

                The author’s comment would have been much less egregious 10 years ago, but we all moved on and grew up and gained sensitivity to the fact that by calling people names that drip with sexist venom we are doing real harm.

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            You have an incredible talent for reading minds.

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          Why now? Why is Twitter locking my account for a nine year old tweet? I can’t imaging anyone going through tweets from 2010 and actively reporting them, so it seems more likely that they must be using some algorithm to go back and find posts they consider offensive, throughout the history of their site.

          Why can’t this person imagine someone going back through old tweets and reporting them? That seems far more likely to be the case, given that there have been plenty of instances of old tweets being dredged up for various purposes.

          This whole thing is speculation based on an almost-certainly-incorrect conclusion, which the author arrived at in spite of having no supporting evidence, and ignoring (or, perhaps being ignorant of) evidence for the more likely alternative.

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            From the linked post

            I can’t imaging anyone going through tweets from 2010 and actively reporting them, so it seems more likely that they must be using some algorithm to go back and find posts they consider offensive, throughout the history of their site.

            (my emphasis)

            This is a serious allegation to make. Why isn’t it possible that someone is searching for offensive things people said about Sarah Palin 10 years ago, found it, and flagged it?

            If Twitter is scanning old tweets and attempting to erase them, they’re also erasing a part of their history and the history of their users.

            Twitter could go out of business at any time, and people’s tweets would be gone too. It’s a free service. If you’re concerned about your tweets, back them up.

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              Twitter’s archive is of substantial historical value. So long as Twitter actively positions itself as a platform for public debate and political communication, users will expect a greater-than-normal degree of transparency and accountability. While they are not legally required to save all this material, they do have an ethical obligation to document changes that they’ve made to the historical record. I can’t comment on this particular case but I am sure that this will continue to be a problem in the future– especially when they go out of business.

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                This is a serious allegation to make. Why isn’t it possible that someone is searching for offensive things people said about Sarah Palin 10 years ago, found it, and flagged it?

                And how’s that any better? Applying modern rules to historical content isn’t something that should be celebrated in my book. TBH, the tweet in question is a bit on the extreme side, but this concept has also been used as a pretext to de-platform users mostly just due to their ideologies, by reporting tweets that were years old.

                I mean, an easy solution is to just remove all your old tweets. Is that really what they want?!

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                  And how’s that any better? Applying modern rules to historical content isn’t something that should be celebrated in my book.

                  We’re talking about ten years, not a thousand. Things haven’t changed that much.

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                    It’s a difference in degree.

                    If someone flags a tweet, presumably someone at Twitter makes the call that this should be cause for locking the account. I.e. there’s a human element in the loop.

                    The author thinks that Twitter without external prompting is flagging tweets and locking accounts. There’s no evidence that this is happening - I’d consider evidence of that being more than one Twitter user reporting that this is happening to them.

                    this concept has also been used as a pretext to de-platform users mostly just due to their ideologies, by reporting tweets that were years old.

                    I am not condoning this, but it’s different from what the author of the linked post is presuming.

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                  Two things on this:

                  I just recently started playing with Twitter’s APIs, and was a bit surprised to discover that you can only retrieve the most recent 3,200 tweets of a user. Any tweets older than that are forever inaccessible by the semi-public API. Note that you seem to need to provide a rather detailed description of what you intend to do with it in order to get developer keys. It seems that there are commercial APIs available for a very substantial price that may allow accessing older tweets, but nobody talks much about them. I did hear a rumor that their Firehose access - all tweets sent by anybody in realtime - costs 30% of your company’s revenue, whatever that is. I’m not sure if that’s true, but it does seem odd that so much of our history on Twitter is, for all practical purposes, forever locked away behind extremely expensive contracts.

                  It also seems that Twitter’s Rules are being weaponized, by both sides of the political divide, in attempts to control the conversation. The ban lists seem semi-random, and the decisions of what is and is not considered hateful seem rather arbitrary, possibly depending on which particular moderator gets a particular case. Aside from the difficulty and expense of accessing old data in general, it’s entirely possible people are running algorithms to search Twitter for potentially actionable things said against their favorite figures, even if they were said very long ago.

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                    Twitter has been slowly cutting all the good bits out of itself ever since they looked up and said “oh HEY we gotta make some money!” a few years back.

                    This is why decentralized platforms will prevail, because people are just not willing to pay for social media en masse.

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                      This is why decentralized platforms will prevail, because people are just not willing to pay for social media en masse.

                      Users are not going to be paying for Twitter any time soon, either? Twitter’s selling their content, but the platform remains free to use, and I can’t see that changing.

                      Companies, meanwhile, are perfectly willing to pay Twitter for access to their data.

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                        That’s right. That’s why the Fediverse’s model will win IMO, but I predict it will take much more work to get where it needs for truly widespread adoption - that being it becoming point and drool easy to start your own instance.

                        Right now you have to have some basic sysadmin skills in order to run one.

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                      I might misremember this, but I believe Twitter made a big splash about how you (as a logger in user) could now access all your tweets. I seem to remember downloading an archive back when that happened.

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                        You can download your own tweets, yeah. In the web interface, it’s under Settings->Account->Your Twitter data. What’s not possible to do easily is get the full tweet history of anyone else.

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                          What’s not possible to do easily is get the full tweet history of anyone else.

                          I’m certain that this is for performance reasons. No doubt if you pay for API access it’s possible.

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                      This is a good reminder that twitter is someone else’s computer, and they can remove your content for any arbitrary reason and should not be trusted with it. It’s bad that so many influential people use twitter as a form of public communication and everyone should be interested in using alternatives to twitter that don’t allow random people to arbitrarily start bureaucratic processes that result in the removal of your content.

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                        Twitter is easy to use, that’s one of the reasons I use it.

                        It is possible to have a public, but not someone else’s computer, shared space? I know it’s possible, but maybe the real question is if it is practical.

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                          Yeah, it’s possible to imagine specific software systems that are consistent with being public spaces where individuals have private control over their own data. This is what Urbit is trying to create, for instance, and it’s one of the things that decentralized social networking protocols like ActivityPub and Scuttlebut are trying to allow developers to build. There are good structural reasons why this is harder than just turning over your data to a centralized service, and they’ve attracted less engineering effort than centralized services so far.

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                            Yeah, it’s possible to imagine specific software systems that are consistent with being public spaces where individuals have private control over their own data.

                            Like… websites? Blogs? Forums?

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                        Twitter will eat itself, and when it does, the Fediverse will be there.

                        However, I totally agree that the original tweet wasn’t just immature, it was in fact hate speech.