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    Whoa, so Flpc stands for “Forth Lisp Python Continuum”? That acronym’s hiding some major awesomeness.

    I went digging for more about your project, and found the repository’s README. Neato. In an old Reddit comment, you say that FLPC came from “wanting a Python with a Forth(-like) as its bytecode”. Is that also what FLPC ended up being, or did it take some turns along the way? That runtime grammar modification is looking very impressive.

    Congratulations on attaining self-hosting! Time for flag beer*! (Flag beer is how Dutch builders celebrate that though the building isn’t done yet, its highest point has been reached.)

    * or flag tea, flag lemonade, flag hot chocolate, flag tonic …. the point is the celebration.

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      Thanks! I’m glad to see you liked it enough to try and find out more about FLPC. Unfortunately, there’s isn’t much more written right now.

      In an old Reddit comment, you say that FLPC came from “wanting a Python with a Forth(-like) as its bytecode”. Is that also what FLPC ended up being, or did it take some turns along the way?

      Yes, that’s what it ended up being. Or rather I haven’t (had to) change the bytecode semantics since that post.

      However, I found out (but don’t remember if it was before or after that Reddit post) that some Python’s own bytecode was already pretty Forth-like. I looked at some dis output and poked at it with cpyasm. Though there are things it definitely couldn’t do. I think it was either run-time gotos or writing to memory that was hard.