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    computer science open rankings compsci education drafty.cs.brown.edu
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    /US/ computer science dept rankings. The USA is not the centre of the universe. It’s not even the centre of the Computer Science universe :)

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      I guess what @pja is trying to say is something along the lines of

      The title should have read computer science open rankings in the USA

      It would be quite interresting to see a world ranking, indeed. Given that it isn’t explicit, it does seem a little clickbaity - I fell for it.

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        As an American, I’m offended by this statement!

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          It’s not even the centre of the Computer Science universe :)

          Remind me, I forget, which country are Google, Microsoft, Apple, Mozilla, Tesla, the Linux Foundation, and the FSF headquartered in again?

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            Applied computing != computer science

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              Where was the World Wide Web born? Where was Linux written?

              I don’t see the point with this exercise.

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            Many things are not captured in this rubric. The most obvious thing from my university experience which is missing here is the connection to Free Software. I got to write Free Software on campus, evangelize Free Software adoption to the rest of the electrical-engineering school, and participate in a well-funded Linux User Group.

            Undergraduate class quality is often lackluster and must be supplemented. I could write better C than the person whose lectures I attended, because they had never written C in non-pedagogical settings. I taught teachers’ assistants facts about Python. What really matters is the community of students and professors who create learning opportunities outside of the classroom.

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              Absolutely, I would love to capture those qualities in a ranking. This project is a meta ranker, so it combines existing ranking sources (two of the rankings sources we generate ourselves, one at considerable expense). If you know of a good ranking that captures these qualitative measures, that would be amazing. I’d even pay for a service that collects this data and provides the ranking.

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                What really matters is the community of students and professors who create learning opportunities outside of the classroom.

                This was my experience too. Evangelism for applied coding is really important in these settings, even though it’s not always the focus.

                My anecdote here: I helped run our school hackerspace and ran our CTF team, and we always struggled getting students actively involved because no one had time outside class. It’s a shame, since having lots of students pushing each other to learn and challenge each other helps everyone hone their skills. We ended up advertising the CTF team in our security class, but got… maybe one student to join. No one would make time. So there were like four or five students involved, max.

                We ended up roping one of the professors in, who ordered pizza for us broke undergrads and spent a night or two staring at x86 disassembly with us. So we tried to make the best of it. Goes to show how students won’t get involved even if the professors will given the wrong structural incentives.

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                I wonder what the correlation between rankings and quality of undergraduate programs is (quality of individual courses and of overall curriculum).

                My personal experience is at a university listed in the Top 15 on this site, yet the first two year sequence of (arguably important) fundamental courses is carried out almost entirely by lecturers with no relation to a publication-based ranking.

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                  My experience in compsci programs at two top-ten universities on this list (undergrad + grad) is that courses were mostly taught by research faculty who had no interest or particular aptitude for teaching. Full-time lecturers were consistently better educators than research faculty, with a few notable exceptions.

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                    Strangely, it’s the exact opposite for me.

                    The full-time lecturers were rather mediocre: their courses were essentially “let’s read a slide deck together.” The concepts taught lacked motivation and context.

                    Whereas the professors I took (senior-level/grad) classes with had far more engaging courses. But all of the ones I sat classes with had a visible interest in teaching.

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                    I agree, the rankings are definitely skewed towards graduate program factors like publications and reputation. I think part of it is that it’s difficult to measure teaching. Maybe the factor that’s slightly relevant to that is the placement rank where the undergraduate degree institution of faculty is accounted for.

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                    Just got out from Georgia Tech, seeing this makes me super proud to be a Yellow Jacket! Regardless of rankings, Tech is a great school and I’m super lucky to have gotten the chance to go there. THWg!

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                      Thank you for the rankings! Just at the right time too :)

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                        Neat, my university shows up on this list. Nowehere near the top, but on the list 🙂

                        e: Also, I only did undergrad.

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                          Same, although I left in ’92, so I doubt my experiences have much to say about their current rating.

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                          I think everyone agrees rankings are kind of silly.

                          But if I’m to offer some critique, I find csrankings.org’s methodology pretty robust and I like the idea of introducing the ‘best paper award’ criteria. Though, the collection of conferences they’ve picked seems fairly haphazard. For example, there’s not one robotics conference included. csrankings tries harder to take all sub-disciplines into account.

                          Factoring in US News rankings…I’m not so sure.