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    Most of the developers at $WORK are remote, and we’re scattered all across the globe. It’s great! We keep in touch via various chat channels, and keep track of work via Jira issues. Every now and then we get the team together somewhere for both socialising and same-room working. The only real downside I can see is that I’m going to be miserable if I have to go back to a commute to another a cubicle farm some day.

    I couldn’t recommend it enough.

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      The only real downside I can see is that I’m going to be miserable if I have to go back to a commute to another a cubicle farm some day.

      I really hope that 100 years from now we’ll look back on the idea of spending an hour driving thru heavy traffic each way every day with as much disgust and horror as we view drinking from lead pipes in ancient Rome. It’s just so toxic to your psyche.

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        How do you manage hours of work when you do remote?

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          Not the OP, but I do work on an all-remote team.

          We just work 9-5 local time. Sometimes timezones and DST conspire to offset a few of us by an hour or two, but it’s not a big deal. We always have a solid ~5 hours of overlap each day anyway.

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            I don’t, really. I tend to be “at work” from about 7:30am to 5-7pm ish, but I have a few breaks to work out, run errands, or to just go outside and walk around the block or lie in the hammock for 15 minutes to clear my head when I need to. When I’m blocked on a CI build or getting feedback / direction on an issue, I can go sit outside away from the screens. When you don’t have the pressure to look busy that you get in a cube farm, what might normally seem like a long day doesn’t wreck you like it otherwise might. Ditto being able to wear clothes to work that aren’t a constant physical discomfort :)

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              Also not the OP, but on a fully remote team.

              We don’t really manage hours and trust that people are doing the work. Sometimes people will work non-traditional hours but we try to schedule our meetings during overlap hours. I personally am an 8-5er, but others aren’t.

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            As a recent member of those who work entirely remote – and one who thoroughly appreciates and enjoys it – I don’t buy this argument as it is presented.

            I’ve read the same kind of argument for the other side of the coin. The problem is that reality is much more nuanced. Yeah, that’s a tired argument but sadly it’s true. Take this quote, for example:

            “The office is actually an amazingly noisy environment. There’s a cake in the break room; Bob’s leaving, come join. The World Cup sweepstakes is going. Whatever it is, the office is super-distracting.”

            That’s some serious cherry-picking there. Let’s not kid anyone: home is super-distracting as well. It takes discipline to get in the hours when you don’t have anyone supervising you. And in my experience, it’s open offices that are super-distracting, not cubicle style ones. Even open offices, if not too large (8 or fewer people), aren’t intrinsically bad.

            Furthermore, this article presents a single study. It’s as convincing as saying, “well, it worked for me, so it will work for you.” I do think it’s something that can work wonderfully, but please stop selling it like it will cure all a company’s ills.

            (For an example of the same kind of (one-sided) article expounding the bad parts of remote work, see this one, wherein the company owner who nixed the working from home option opines, “But the working-from-home thing has to be on a per-person basis, and it can’t be very often. It just doesn’t work.”)

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              That’s some serious cherry-picking there. Let’s not kid anyone: home is super-distracting as well. It takes discipline to get in the hours when you don’t have anyone supervising you.

              The difference to me is that one of them is in your power to fix and one isn’t. Yes, it can take a lot of work to make the changes to your home that make it a productive environment for work, but they’re all changes that you as an individual can carry out. If you can do the same at an office, more power to you, but most people can’t.

              However, I agree that the article is one-sided, especially ending with “There’s not much to lose, and there’s a lot to gain” is disingenuous; this only works in an atmosphere where there’s trust between workers and management, and there is an awful lot to lose in a dysfunctional organization.

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                On the other hand, if the dysfunctional no-trust organisations go belly up and we end up selecting for high-trust teams that actually get stuff done, the world will be a much better place :)