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    Gotta say this is exciting. I don’t see myself dumping OSX any time soon because I have my environment tuned just the way I like it over there, but knowing that there’s another workable environment with a POSIX shell I can flip to when needed is a real boon.

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      I took the plunge, got a Surface Book and have been using the WSL as my main “window manager” for the past 4 months. I still do my development (such as it is) on my FreeBSD machine and use Win10 for anything that involves graphical UI.

      I managed to build Swift for my day job on it, so I was pretty impressed. WSL is rough around the edges, but I’ll be damned: it actually works. I use Emacs to do pretty much everything and pretty much everything I want to do works, except for SBCL. The terminal isn’t good, but I can run an SSH server locally and use PuTTY to connect, so that’s fine.

      With respect to Win10 and related stuffs, I barely use it. It exists to show me a browser, PDFs, and images. I was able to, for the most part, use Windows as my window manager, so I’m content for the time being. I’m looking forward to the enhancements.

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        The terminal isn’t good, but I can run an SSH server locally and use PuTTY to connect, so that’s fine.

        I’m not a Windows user but I believe there are alternative terminals available that are a lot better than the default - ConEmu is one popular example.

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        Interested to find out more about how well running Windows programmes from within WSL works. The ability to include Windows programmes within scripts and use piping etc. could be very useful.

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          If you have any specific questions, I’m happy to answer. I’ve worked on and off for the last two months getting to a point where Khan Academy’s entire dev chain runs well under WSL, so I feel I’ve got a pretty good knowledge of what works well, what works at all, and what’s broken or painful. At a high level, I’ll say that, beginning with some of the Creator’s Update betas, I’ve been really impressed; the main issues I’ve hit have to do with the Windows and Linux file systems, while both being accessible from the others' tools, not using the same paths, semantics, permissions models, and so on. The most concrete issue that’s brought up is that, while Khan Academy’s website runs in WSL just fine, and while you can check the code out on Windows, you cannot run the thing from the Windows checkout, and you cannot edit a Linux checkout with a Windows program (such as PyCharm). I’ve handled that by running PyCharm in X from WSL, but…yeah.

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            you cannot edit a Linux checkout with a Windows program (such as PyCharm).

            I hear they’re going to be fixing this soon; I thought it was in this update, but they also didn’t mention it.

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              I’ve heard they’re going to fix it, but I haven’t seen them actually do so yet. “All” they’d have to do is not clobber the NTFS file stream in charge of Unix permissions, and I assume they deliberately picked a brand-new and weird location for that stream specifically so that they could transparently have the Win32 subsystem not touch it, but this was still broken as of roughly one month ago on the Slow insider update channel.