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    As someone who is mostly using Debian/Ubuntu on the server side, I have two questions:

    1. Is there someone who is going to use the Stream in production? I know how Stream differs in principle from, e.g. Rocky Linux, but have no insight into the state of practice.

    2. Were does CentOS Stream fit if we use the Debian/Ubuntu analogy? Fedora releases twice a year and that maps to Ubuntu .04/.10 releases. Debian and Ubuntu LTS are released every 2 years but remain supported for 5+ years, which should map to RHEL/Rocky. The webpage linked says that support for CentOS Stream 9 ends when RHEL 9 is EOLed, which is in 2027. Still how much breakage CentOS Stream 9 users are expected to see until 2027?

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      1. CERN and Fermilab say that they are going to, for example. https://indico.cern.ch/event/1070475/contributions/4511844/attachments/2309304/3929738/lfc03-20210915-NoNDA.pdf And that’s a pretty compelling story, I think.

      2. Changes to Stream are in the gap between consecutive versions of RHEL. So, for example, stuff going in to Stream 8 right now reflects changes between RHEL 8.5 and 8.6, which is typically very small. So, typically, there’s going to be very little change. Another difference is that you get that incrementally, rather than the big per-version bump you’re used to with CentOS Linux - which may be a plus or a minus depending on your use case.

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        I suspect not much breakage, since Stream 9 is forked only from Fedora 34 and then is not updated from Fedora again. (At least as the graphic in the post shows)

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          (RH Employee here full disclosure)

          1. Is there someone who is going to use the Stream in production? I know how Stream differs in principle from, e.g. Rocky Linux, but have no insight into the state of practice.

          Stream is basically the “next point release” of RHEL before it is cut. Like if the current release of RHEL is 8.4 then Stream would be what will become RHEL 8.5, and after that release is cut it is RHEL 8.6 - it sits right in front of RHEL. Since we don’t ship breaking changes in point releases it’s a pretty safe bet.

          Where Rocky/Alma try to be the exact same code as RHEL, Stream might not be the exact same code (depending on the package) as RHEL but the only changes are the minor package updates included in the next release. IMO it is basically the same as CentOS of yore but the main difference being its not quite a clone, more like a twin.

          1. Were does CentOS Stream fit if we use the Debian/Ubuntu analogy? Fedora releases twice a year and that maps to Ubuntu .04/.10 releases. Debian and Ubuntu LTS are released every 2 years but remain supported for 5+ years, which should map to RHEL/Rocky. The webpage linked says that support for CentOS Stream 9 ends when RHEL 9 is EOLed, which is in 2027. Still how much breakage CentOS Stream 9 users are expected to see until 2027?

          Correct, CentOS Stream X will have the same support cycle as RHELX’s “Full Support” cycle, ~5 years.

          As far as mapping goes - it basically is RHEL Beta. I want to say it’s like debian testing but I am not a debian user - it isn’t the next major release it is the next minor release so they’re very very close.


          Hopefully this is clear as mud.

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            As far as mapping goes - it basically is RHEL Beta. I want to say it’s like debian testing but I am not a debian user - it isn’t the next major release it is the next minor release so they’re very very close.

            Debian testing does not have any sort of stability guarantee except in the few months before a stable release, when testing is frozen, and even there the goal is not strictly speaking stability but instead to prepare for the release. AFAIUI Stream is much more similar to Debian’s proposed updates archive.

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            Im fairly sure facebook is running Stream

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            Is a point-in-time rolling release really appealing to anyone?

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              No.