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    I like s-q-l but I hear sequel a lot more

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      In my university, and at school, (Germany) I’ve never heard anyone say sequel, only SQL. Probably because it is interpreted as an acronym.

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        In real world office talk, always s-q-l but in academics, “sequel”. I think there is a pattern here.

        Some acronyms are meant to be pronounceable but I don’t think that’s SQL’s case.

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        The “correct” pronunciation of SQLite (source: I attended a lecture by Dr. Richard Hipp) is S-Q-L-ite”

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          team “sequel” reporting in

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            Squirrel. Because I learned during the era of Embedded Squirrel, in Ingres.

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              It’s supposed to be “sequel”, but I say s-q-l because sequel doesn’t make any sense to me.

              I will, however, fight to death anybody who mispronounces router as “rooter”.

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                I will, however, fight to death anybody who mispronounces router as “rooter”.

                What does a router do? It routes packets. It does not rout the packets, they are not fleeing the battlefield in retreat.

                Do you pronounce “Route 66” as “Root” or “Rowt”?

                (I realise this is an “American” vs “English” distinction, it’s just one that has always confused me.)

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                  they are not fleeing the battlefield in retreat.

                  After my networking code gets done with them they are,

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                    Evidently you follow Klingon coding best practices.

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                    I say /ɹaʊt/ 66, always, but /ɹuːt/ 66 doesn’t bother me nearly as much as when talking about routers.

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                  My company has sql in the name, and someone working in the building said, what is “something”-squirrel?