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    new is always better philosophy dgsiegel.net
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    Lobsters isn’t write-only. Submit other stuff, too, or comment on other people’s submissions.

    EDIT: wait a sec, this article is from March. You’ve published ten things since then, and your Lobsters submissions are just in reverse chronological order. Are you just posting your entire archives to Lobsters? Is this just a inbound channel?

    EDIT2: From your homepage:

    I give you the strategy, technology, and skills to become a trusted brand […] Marketing gurus are a dime a dozen. My approach is different – think of me as a sparring partner who will sharpen your skills and plan your attack. We’ll work together to create a cohesive strategy, technology and tools that inspire long-term connections and fuel sustainable growth. It’s about trust. It’s about reputation. It’s about telling your story in a way that gets results.

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      Lobsters isn’t write-only. Submit other stuff, too, or comment on other people’s submissions.

      I don’t understand: why can’t a user submit their own content exclusively, as long as the submissions are of high quality? From my perspective, well-received self-marketing materials are still a contribution to the community, even if the author themself may benefit from the submission.

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        It’s not a hard and fast rule.

        @hwayne is doing OP a favor by giving them a heads-up.

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          Good question. From Mitigating Content Marketing:

          We now consistently average over 20k visitors per weekday. Programming is an enormous, growing, lucrative, powerful industry and thus a very expensive demographic to advertise to. A link on our homepage sends traffic that would otherwise cost $15-30k on Twitter, AdWords, or LinkedIn.

          When this is sending attention to celebrate someone advancing the state of our understanding or sharing what they’ve created, it’s the internet at its best as gift economy. Unfortunately, some people see the site as a handful of rubes naively standing around a money fountain, so why not try to take a taste?

          People who are only submitting their own content exclusively are overwhelmingly (not entirely, but overwhelmingly) bad-faith actors who are just using us for free advertising. People who are commenting or submitting other stuff are at least making an effort to participate in the rest of the community.

          I’m being a bit harsher with this comment, because I was more polite with my comment on his previous story:

          Welcome to lobsters! Generally we encourage people to post and comment on articles they haven’t written, too, to participate more in the community.

          So either he’s not reading comments, which means he’s just spamming, or he read my comment and doesn’t care, in which case he’s bad-faith.

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            Hey, I am verry sorry that my actions were seen as spammy behaviour, that was not my intention at all. I’ve been reading the philosophy section of lobsters for years and just wanted to contribute a few ideas myself.

            I’ll try to submit some other interesting links as well in the future and try to be more active with the comments.

            Thanks

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              People who are only submitting their own content exclusively are overwhelmingly (not entirely, but overwhelmingly) bad-faith actors who are just using us for free advertising.

              Sure, but let’s not confuse heuristics with what those heuristics are trying to detect. This particular case feels suspect to me, since the site features a few CTAs for paid services. But I think it’s important to point out that it’s not inherently a bad faith action to only post articles to your own blog. The issue is when the content is trying to make a sale. There’s clearly grey area between “good faith posting of excellent content that only I have written” and “posting on your forum in order to sell you something”. And since we can’t read minds, I think that:

              Submit other stuff, too, or comment on other people’s submissions.

              …demanding engagement from someone like this seems unnecessarily hostile, setting a negative tone for newcomers. Why not just flag as spam, provide the feedback, and then let the mods take action if needed? For example, “you seem to only be posting links to your blog which is also trying to sell me services. this isn’t a place for content marketing, and people get banned for it pretty regularly. check out this post for background”

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                For example, “you seem to only be posting links to your blog which is also trying to sell me services. this isn’t a place for content marketing, and people get banned for it pretty regularly. check out this post for background”

                Man, that’s much better copy. Strikes the right balance of polite without being too “nice”. Gonna use that instead from now on

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          Some nitpicks with the following paragraph:

          When you study computer science, you’ll probably start with low level computing, like assembly or machine code. Soon you will learn a higher-level language, like C, or move on to object-oriented programming in Java, and if you’re lucky you will learn about more modern languages like Python, JavaScript or Go. You won’t stop there of course, learning about the recent frameworks, from Django to React or Vue. Maybe you even jumped in at some random point and moved onwards from there.

          • Machine code? in first-year CS? I’d be impressed to hear of a single place that offers a course like this.
          • Higher-level language, like… C?
          • Python (1991) is older than Java (1995).
          • JavaScript (December 1995) isn’t much newer than Java (May 1995).