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    For the love of all that is good, please don’t read the comments.

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      You probably should avoid reading comments on any YouTube video.

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        I never read the comments. Yet, because of your note I did. Thanks. Thanks a lot.

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          The comments are a little harsh, but I’m curious if they’ve compared this method with typical soldering by hand. Are they really gaining anything with all of the effort?

          I’m also a little surprised they even solder boards by hand. How does their technique compare to wave soldering in Nitrogen atmosphere?

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            In aerospace in general the work is real engineering (and very conservative). It’s not too hard to find some references in a quick web search: - https://goo.gl/Yn06K1 - https://goo.gl/t1LsOv

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              In aerospace in general the work is real engineering (and very conservative). It’s not too hard to find some references in a quick web search: - https://goo.gl/Yn06K1 - https://goo.gl/t1LsOv

              The first paper claims there was no statistically significant reliability difference between convection reflow soldering, “JPL standard hand soldering”, and “optimized hand soldering”, and suggests a new study with a larger sample size.

              The second paper seems to be about soldering leaded parts in general, and would presumably apply to any type of soldering.

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                I only posted those to point out that there’s some evidence people have been looking. My guess is that there’s a body of work in journals or government archives from earlier in the space program, DTIC would probably be a good place to start. The current practice was probably built incrementally from learnings in many individual failures, if you were going to find a comparison to commercial techniques it would be of some kind of evaluation of a COTS module vs its mil-spec equivalent.

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              In aerospace you follow the rules and know when your life depends on the rules or when you’re just following the guidebook. I was flying around one time on an 86F day and we still added carb heat on our decent, and kinda smiled at the thought of ice on that hot day. :)

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                Don’t forget that if you are flying at 30,000ft the temperature could be below freezing. If you were in a prop though you probably weren’t that high. :)

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                  Yeah at 30k feet you’re going to be very cold. We were probably right around 3500 feet up. We’re doing the avionics on a glasair III soon so this video was a good refresher.

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                  I’m not saying they should do a half-assed job, but they seem to be choosing a weird middle ground.

                  If they really want high quality solders, why not have a robot soldering in an inert atmosphere or clean room or something? There’s a higher up front cost, but in the long run it will give better, more precise, reproducible solders for a lower overall cost.

                  Their current technique would be a lot more expensive in the long run because of all the extra steps and manual labor. Especially weird if there’s no evidence that their technique works any better than what any electronics tinkerer could do in ¼ the time.

                  I’m not sure your example works because there’s only one list of steps for landing the plane. In the soldering case, there are multiple ways to do it, each with their own list of steps. I’m curious why they chose A, when B or C could achieve the same results cheaper or with stronger solders or both.

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                    “There’s a higher up front cost, but in the long run it will give better, more precise, reproducible solders for a lower overall cost.” You contradicted yourself in the same sentence. The reality is that robots do not do a better job for less cost. In the aviation industry the volume is far too low to tool something like that. The parts are too varied and they have already worked out the kinks of soldering by hand. As for the method of soldering, “strength of solder” and “cheap” are not the goal here. Joints that do not corrode matter. Not damaging a sensitive piece of electrical equipment matters. Visual inspection matters. Robots do not offer that same type of result. This is something that is expected to be in service for more than 30 years. Not a 5 dollar phone that lasts 3 years.