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    My and one other person’s comments over here from an earlier post https://lobste.rs/s/9uld7l/on_eme_html5

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      He and the W3C only has as much power as we assign to them. If we convince companies like Mozilla, Google, and Microsoft (hey, crazier things have happened) to fight against this standard and the W3C, then we can challenge the legitimacy of a decision users seem to wholesale disagree with.

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        If we convince companies like Mozilla, Google, and Microsoft

        Who’s “we”? I think in Chrome you can’t even disable EME anymore to “protest”. The only thing I can do is never buy anything with DRM, and so far I managed to avoid doing that. I only started buying DVDs after their DRM was broken. For the web: if youtube-dl doesn’t work I don’t watch it.

        …users seem to wholesale disagree…

        Filter bubble: I don’t think users wholesale disagree.They just want to watch Netflix and HBO on their iPad and couldn’t care less about DRM if it allows for them more or less to do what they want. They don’t care if watching video doesn’t work on some nerd’s BSD machine or that libraries will have trouble archiving the content for future generations.

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          So you’re saying Lee and the W3C only have the power assigned to them by enormous multinational corporations owning the browsers we don’t even pay money for?

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            No, I’m saying they’re a consortium browser vendors choose to follow. Microsoft has a long history of ignoring web standards, for example.

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            If “we” do this then aren’t we setting a very dangerous principle for these huge companies to, once again, go forward with nonstandard implementations of everything?

            We just got to a point where HTML5 is reasonably stable across most browsers and the latest JavaScript is making it’s way in.

            I’m not saying I’m for DRM, I’m just saying I’m worried about giving Google and Microsoft the a-ok to just ignore the standard when “we” don’t like it.