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A bill is also currently before parliament to fine people who refuse digital strip searches to be fined up to $5000.

What steps do lobsters take to preserve their privacy while traveling via air?

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    Know your rights in both your home country and the country you’re visiting helps, but it’s inadvisable to travel with any device you’d mind being siezed. Store your important files remotely and download them when you reach your destination, especially if you’re going to a country known to do such searches (I’ve heard storied about UK/US/NZ/DE so far).

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      If it’s at all reasonable, don’t travel by air.

      If you must, never carry meaningful data on your person. Encrypt it and ship keys and encrypted data separately (and preferably separately from yourself).

      Note that “shipping encrypted data” is incredibly easy for low volumes: put it on the Internet. Keys are a little harder; it probably suffices to check the device that contains them, but shipping them entirely separately (e.g. via international post) is preferable.

      Alternatively, carry burner devices with no interesting personal info on them; but this may be infeasible depending on the purpose of your travel. (I flew to Europe in May for a vacation and took this approach—my phone has only contacts and a very boring call and text message history, and I prepped a laptop with a temporary password and useful credentials that couldn’t be exploited for further credentials: my travel agent, for instance, and lobste.rs, but not my primary email. Of course, I’m thoroughly uninteresting, so none of this was needed, but it made me feel better, so eh.)

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        If it’s at all reasonable, don’t travel by air.

        If you are going cross-border, then you don’t really have many options besides air.

        What are they expected to find anyway? They think pedos/terrorists are gonna have illegalplan.pdf sitting on their computer?

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          If you are going cross-border, then you don’t really have many options besides air.

          Depends on where you are. In the mid-west, I wholeheartedly agree. In Europe you can cross 3-5 countries in 2 hours of driving, in and outside of the EU/Schengen area.

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              I’ve yet to go through FRA without being stopped and searched, and occasionally having the Polizei go through my bags.

              I tend to carry a lot of electronics hardware, dupont cables and breadboards, and most of the time they just don’t know what they’re looking at on the scanner.

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            I regularly cross the US border on foot. Depends on where you live, I guess.

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              What are they expected to find anyway? They think pedos/terrorists are gonna have illegalplan.pdf sitting on their computer?

              I believe disk imaging is the main concern. I’m not sure how realistic that is, but I don’t have a hard time imagining that there are off-the-shelf systems that can clone the majority of consumer phones/laptops. Does this actually happen? Who knows. If you were actually a “person of interest” there are far more worrying things that could happen to you at a border than having your laptop’s SSD cloned.

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            I tend to keep a spare notebook and phone for countries that are less friendly with your data. I run Nextcloud for all my personal data, webmail for my mail. There isn’t any personal data nor social media on these devices only work related data that is not very sensitive. I tend to travel a lot for work. On my phone I haven’t activated the fingerprint reader but only secured with a simple pin code. For the US it becomes more tricky to not share your social media accounts as this is now part of ESTA, albeit optional.

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              NZ? Seriously?

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                Wow this sucks.