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    Gleam looks like the perfect foray into the Erlang ecosystem. It really helps to have a compiler assist you when getting started on a new platform/runtime.

    One nit: I wish the bitly/tiny example was a bit more fleshed out to help guide beginners on best practices.

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      Thank you for the kind words!

      Yes for sure, it needs attention. I’m hoping now that v0.8 is out we can focus more on that, though with Midas framework in development we may point to an example from there instead.

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      This is great. Please keep it up!

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        Thank you!

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        Really digging the new features, should definitely help with getting more people to try out the language (myself included). Thanks and congrats on the release!

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          Thank you very much!

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          Louis, is Gleam based on the lambda-calculus like other ML are, with a CoreFn backend at the bottom, or is the ML syntax just on the surface? I’m asking because I saw purerl and I am interested in how you did everything. Cheers!

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            Gleam’s type system is based upon the lambda-calculus, it’s a good fit for Erlang.

            CoreFn I believe is an intemediate representation in the PureScript compiler. The Gleam compiler is written from scratch and shares no code with PureScript, so we don’t use CoreFn. We do have 2 internal ways of representing Gleam code, though I imagine both are very simple compared to PureScript as we have a smaller feature set at present.

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              Thank you very much for the answer! I am always interested in BEAM languages that are based on Lambda-calculus, as I am an Elixir and Haskell developer. Thank you for filling the gap. :)