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    I love how effortless upgrading is, these days.

    This time around, all I did after unattended “sysupgrade” was some sysmerge which I could actually have been fine without, before the deletions, pkg_add -u and rebooting again for good measure.

    It all took less than 10 minutes.

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      Indeed I upgraded this morning, just typed in sysupgrade, took a shower came back and everything “just worked”. I’m so used to having to fight with dragons its more a huge blink moment when stuff doesn’t require a lord of the rings/hobbit “I’m going on an adventure” journey of pain that makes you want to become a monk and swear off technology.

      I wish Linux were half as easy as this is now on openbsd. Forgot to do pkg_add -u doh /quick logs in to update packages. I gotta donate I miss these old unix “stuff just works its an appliance” os’s. Linux these days feels like I’m some sort of wizard with all the stuff barely working on one flavor of things, advancing to flavor+N always seems like I’m conjuring some demon from the computer.

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        I’ve found Debian to be very painless in terms of upgrading, especially when you stick to stable.

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          I had been putting off an upgrade to Debian Buster on a home server for fear of encountering difficulties. But the whole process was fast and easy.

          My only complaint was the recommended apt full-upgrade used some sort of built-in pager, and I couldn’t scroll up to check for problems or notes installing the new packages. I sat and watched the upgrade to reassure myself. Next time I’ll use apt-get dist-upgrade, like I have in the past.

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            Indeed from Ubuntu to UOS, all the Debian variants inherently do this pretty well.

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              Not sure I can agree, one of the worst upgrades I’ve ever experienced was upgrading Ubuntu from 12.04 to 14.04. rpm hell was less painful than the apt contortions I had to figure out. Just ended up reinstalling from scratch in the end.

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          Yes, I am thinking that I should have relied on sysupgrade/sysmerge. I ran into a problem with my wifi card when trying fresh install

          My wifi card (Intel Centrino Advanced-N 6205 rev 0x34) did not work for some reason (it worked with 6.7)

          Connected via ethernet and tried fw_update but it cannot seem find firmware files on the external site (or something else is wrong) Ended up submitting a bug report, using sendbug.

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          Love that reference to Hackers in the poster.

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            I’m surprised to see a *bsd post not by @vermaden

            Is there a song this time as well?

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                I wanted to but someone else was faster :)

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                  Is there a “best-of” or “significant changes” list for OpenBSD releases? The changelog is detailed, but it’s easy to miss something between the points one might not be familiar with.

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                    undeadly.org usually has a list of the “highlights” in their articles about new releases. The one about 6.7 can be found here. I don’t see anything for 6.8 yet though.

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                      An in-kernel WireGuard driver and TLSv1.3 being enabled in LibreSSL were the two things that stood out for me. Here’s the Undeadly article.

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                        List of most significant innovations - https://www.openbsd.org/innovations.html

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                          I’m familiar with that page, it’s just not 6.8-specific.

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                            Right, you’ve used plural releases and didn’t mention 6.8 specifically:

                            Is there a “best-of” or “significant changes” list for OpenBSD releases?

                            It’s either changelog - the plusXX.html pages - or the relase pages - XX.html - themselves. The latter is separated into sections in case you’d like to look at bugfixes, kernel, userland, etc.

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                              I see why you thought that I was looking for something like innovations.html, the question was ambiously phrased.

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                        When would someone prefer OpenBSD to FreeBSD?

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                          For me, better defaults.

                          I just installed it, the only configuration change I needed to do was to activate apm.

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                            The minimalism is appealing, simply because there’s less you need to understand to feel confident in your systems. (same reason why I prefer to run OpenBSD over Linux.)

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                              Security, cohesion.

                              I would probably use openbsd (rather than freebsd) if not for zfs.

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                                All the time? ;D

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                                  FreeBSD is I think the right choice if you want to have a good base with ZFS and every software out there packaged and up to date.

                                  OpenBSD is like a study in simplicity. I really enjoy things like how they manage wireless networks, no networkmanager or wpa_supplicant, sound without pulseaudio (you can use sndio on FreeBSD as well but you need to compile your own packages).

                                  OpenBSD feels more like things done right/simple, while FreeBSD for many purposes feels more like “a better linux distribution”, with both stable base and up to date packages, without having to deal with third party repositories

                                  Another differencen for the decision can be whether you want to use just base. While on FreeBSD you can do some basic stuff like running an NFS server without any packages, OpenBSD will give you an httpd server, complete with the means to get a letsencrypt or other acme based certificate, you will also get a pretty nice smtp server (no imap server though) and also typical user facing things, like tmux, X with a couple of window managers are part of the base system.

                                  But then again very big reason for choosing any general purpose OS is taste.

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                                    OpenBSD is simpler in all the good ways, but lacks some important tech. Jails and ZFS at least.

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                                      ZFS

                                      There was talk of porting HAMMER from Dragonfly years ago. I expect this to happen with HAMMER2 at some point.

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                                        That would be very cool indeed. Figuring out an openbsdy way to do jails would be amazing as well.

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                                    Great news. Rather curiously I see there’s an SGI release - I thought the SGI port was discontinued after 6.7 (the port page still says as much)?

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                                      Do the other mainstream BSDs already have gettimeofday without a context switch? I assumed everyone already did this years ago.

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                                        OpenBSD is pretty defensive with optimizations, because i they typically lead to complexity, which results in bugs, which cause security issues. I think one of the main drivers here were things like browser performance becoming unbearably bad.

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                                          Makes sense. Also since gettimeofday is ~free on Linux it’s going to be used freely in Unix software and platforms where it’s expensive will suffer. Kind of like how stat is extremely cheap on Unixes and then when you try and run Unix software on Windows everything sucks badly.

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                                        I recommend listening to the song. https://ftp.openbsd.org/pub/OpenBSD/songs/song68.mp3

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                                          I also recommend listening to the song, but: https://ftp.openbsd.org/pub/OpenBSD/songs/song68.ogg

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                                          Any hope of getting a newer loongson support? The newer 3000 stuff is way better, at least it has ddr4 and pcie/sata onboard.

                                          I’ve been able to get the Lemote A1901’s outside of China

                                          https://wiki.godson.ac.cn/device:lemote_a1901