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    On the subject of the rebels having no use for the death star, I disagree, if were arguing about made up stuff, I’d like to bring to mind that nations on earth in “The fountains of paradise” were able to turn floating war citadels into meteorological stations. Whats to say the rebels couldnt have used the death star as a portable terraforming station or something like that.

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      The death star is a habitat, even if it does nothing else of use.

      It must house millions of storm troopers; even the surface of a reasonable-sized moon would take that many to fill, and this is three-dimensional, and the various imagery of its structure suggests it has rooms throughout. They don’t exactly commute home to Coruscant at night.

      It’s kind of hard to imagine there’s not some planet somewhere which could use extra real estate.

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      As long as we’re taking Star Wars seriously - has anyone seen an in-universe explanation for why Coruscant doesn’t run out of food and water, either in normal day-to-day or after big crises in particular? Galactic City covers the planet in thousands of floors of skyscapers and the population ballparks around a trillion inhabitants. Even the largest ships like the Star Destroyers, if hollowed, couldn’t pack enough for more than a few weeks provisions for a neighborhood. And they’re treated as fairly rare, major military offensives involve fewer than a dozen of them. So what are all these people eating and drinking on their city-planet?

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        Couldnt it work a little like Trantor does in the foundation prequels?

        If my memory is correct, they had whole districts specialised in food production and a few planets for farming.

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          IIRC there weren’t districts on the planet; rather it relied on five nearby agricultural planets whose output was shipped in.

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            Oh, right… that was a plot point in the original trilogy, that the need for food ships allegedly foreshadowed the collapse.

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          What do you mean? They get food from the replicator, obviously.

          If I’m downvoted as a troll, it was worth it.

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            That’s actually an interesting point: energy in the Star Wars universe is apparently free, or close enough that people think nothing of every vehicle under the sun(s) hovering. (The existence of scarcity in a society with a post-scarcity level of technology is left as an exercise for the reader.) Given that, food is just a question of applying enough energy to the right materials in the right ways, and you get plenty of nice complex organic raw materials from the bathrooms that don’t exist anywhere.

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              Arguably, there may have been sewage in the death star trash compactor, which would suggest that bathrooms exist somewhere. But that’s separate from your other point anyway. :)

              I definitely agree with you that energy must be quite cheap - it would be possible to run numbers for what it takes to keep those cars afloat, but it’s a fair amount, and it’s very clear that the hovering serves very limited practical purpose. And, also, there are resource conflicts in the movies but they’re always about physical machinery, not its power source. Power sources are never mentioned that I can remember, and it really does seem like energy is not the limit on the economy.

              I’m not sure fabrication of food is really much easier with the energy available, though. I’m not a chemical engineer and I suppose I can’t really begin to describe the obstacles there, but if they weren’t prohibitive we’d be doing it. We can’t assume the Star Wars universe has this technology without some evidence for it. And, perhaps more interesting to talk about, getting to a post-scarcity civilization has a lot of important prerequisites in addition to energy.

              Oh - and also, the series begins on a farm.

              The whole depiction-or-not of scarcity thing is definitely a dimension in which it’s really interesting to analyze a lot of science fiction; I was just doing that earlier with friends, prompted by this article. :) I can think of a lot of golden-age literature which was effectively narrated like “and the high level of technology meant that there were no problems of any sort for anyone on Earth, which is why this series focuses entirely on people in space, where there were problems”. Depending on your perspective that may be a nice world view, but it’s not very concretely descriptive.