1. 9
  1. 2

    This is very interesting, and that’s a big can of worm as I see it. I don’t see this technology become a new authentication factor, because there’s a lot of way your “behavior” can be altered. Say I cut myself with an envelope, my typing behavior will certainly change a lot. Or if I use my phone rather than laptop, or a keyboard with a foreign layout… Imagine being in a foreign country, and being unable to withdraw some cash because “your typing behavior is unusual” (that would make a cool popup though!). That would suck…

    Now to push the author’s idea even further, you could probably write a similar “typing delay” code for programmable keyboard firmwares like QMK. Keyboards would then be seen as next-gen privacy devices that work independently of the system you’re typing on. This sounds pretty scary…

    Edit Just realised that the article is from 2015. I wonder how these companies have been doing for the last 6 years. Did this technologies become more popular ? The fact we don’t hear much about them can be both relieving or plain scary…

    1. 2

      I don’t think this is going to replace passwords, where I see the main use for this is user tracking via fingerprinting.

    Stories with similar links:

    1. Behavioral Profiling: The password you can't change. via jcs 6 years ago | 22 points | 3 comments