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    Hah, I thought this was referring to Thread Local Storage.

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      Patch notes say “TLS 1.0-1.2”.

      Any particular reason for the omission of TLS-1.3?
      Also, I thought TLS-1.0 was considered pretty insecure[1] at this point?

      [1]: from: wikipedia TLS_1.0

      The PCI Council suggested that organizations migrate from TLS 1.0 to TLS 1.1 or higher before June 30, 2018.[20][21] In October 2018, Apple, Google, Microsoft, and Mozilla jointly announced they would deprecate TLS 1.0 and 1.1 in March 2020.

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        I don’t think Netflix is focusing on TLS 1.3 because it’s not widely implemented yet. And 1.0 is fallback for older devices. Netflix doesn’t really care so much of someone does a MITM of your movie.

        Edit: I’m sure there are smart TVs with the Netflix app that can’t go newer than TLS 1.0 and Netflix is contractually obligated to keep it functioning for now

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          In which way do you think TLS 1.3 is not widely implemented? According to [1] it’s supported by all mainstream browsers in the latest version.

          Things have changed in this regard. For the majority of users these days it’s normal to have a browser that will update itself automatically on a regular basis. I’m pretty sure major sites already see >50% TLS 1.3 traffic.

          Consider this is a performance feature. Which means a) you don’t need 100%, if you support it for 80% you’re already doing pretty fine and b) it seems strange to want the performance of in-kernel TLS and skip the performance benefits of TLS 1.3.

          [1] https://caniuse.com/#feat=tls1-3

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            You’re thinking browsers and I’m thinking devices:

            AppleTV/iOS - not yet

            Roku - not yet

            Etc

            And who watches Netflix in their browser? In all the years I’ve been a customer I don’t think I’ve ever watched in my browser :)

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              I occasionally watch Netflix in Firefox on Linux. Not happy about the DRM aspect of it all, but…

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            Ah right, forgot this is a Netflix thing. That makes sense that they would want to support TLS 1.0 for a while yet.
            Still seems weird to import a possible footgun (TLS-1.0) that will have to be maintained for 5 years (minimum release support guarantee under the new support model?).

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              Still seems weird to import a possible footgun (TLS-1.0) that will have to be maintained for 5 years (minimum release support guarantee under the new support model?).

              Like linux, the key negotiation is still done in userland, it’s just the encryption of packets that is being moved to kernel space and closer to the network driver. I wouldn’t exactly call TLS 1.0 a footgun in that regard.