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    One reason I use Common Lisp (stop laughing! :) ), is that it will basically never change. My code will work for years and years to come: I can build up a substantial investment in code that doesn’t get deprecated in months.

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      Thats why I use Cobol! :P

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        Seriously? :-) On your personal stuff? What compiler/OS?

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          :p

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      Devs don’t have to bet entirely on the current state of the art. There are a wealth of software design techniques intended to protect you specifically from this. For example, it’s prudent to view all of the incidental complexity brought on by AngularactSX as legacy code from the start, resulting in the dev decoupling the business logic from today’s-hotness/tomorrow’s-legacy frameworks.

      This is far, far more pragmatic than rewriting every 6-12 months. Build the essentials of your app on something other than sand castles sitting close to the tide.

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        Does that mean reducing the number lines in client-side code and moving them (the business logic) to server side where you have greater control and longer platform cycles?

        Personally, is something that I agree, but I don’t know if all the full stack/client side programmers agree with this.

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          Not necessarily. Business logic can be decoupled into plain old JS objects that are then used within the UI layer. The UI layer should be about the UI only.

          Putting that on the server is nice from an encapsulation standpoint but there’s no need to induce extra round trips.

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        My team maintains a handful of Ember apps – the first of which we started on in early 2014 – and we’ve never been happier and less JS-fatigued.

        ember-cli is just super super nice for project setup, minimal generators, testing and deployment; addons make it really really easy to abstract away common patterns and integrate with external JS libraries; and the community is wonderful and super-helpful. The 1.x -> 2.x transition could have been smoother, but it was way way easier than learning yet another framework.

        Ember isn’t everyone’s cup of tea and I totally get that but if you’re, uh, tired of JS fatigue and open to a framework, it’s worth a serious look.

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          Also makes the Javascript ecosystem all the more intimidating for new users. One of the things I adore about Python is a nice easy growth curve. Start simple and then expand your horizons as your needs become more complex.

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            As someone who is interested in languages and compilers, this writeup has inspired me to consider JavaScript-related projects as something I would work on. I’ve always known that there is a wealth of interesting stuff happening, but my lack of interest in front-end development held me back.