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    On a tangential note, just yesterday I found out about M-DISC, which might make me buy another burner again. This time for archival purposes though, not warez ;)

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      For me, that was too-little, too late. By the time the 100GB disks came along, I had 1TB+ hard disks that needed backing up. A stack of 10 BD-XL disks (not even the archival M-DISC variants) for 1TB costs over £100, cloud storage costs £2/TB/Month for archive storage, so I can back up the same amount of data for 4 years for the same price (ignoring the cost of the drive). Backing things up to optical disks also means I need to store them somewhere safe and doesn’t help against the threat model of ‘oh dear, my house burned down with my NAS inside’.

      I bought a BluRay writer when I built my NAS and a stack of disks for it, but I’ve never actually used it. Now I use zfsbackup-go to GPG-encrypt ZFS incremental snapshots and send them to the cloud. I can drive that from a cron job and don’t need to insert media for a manual process.

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        Interesting.

        I’m using something inspired by rsnapshot with different servers in different cities that run daily backups via cron. The total set spans a couple of TB with many GBs of change each day and would be a pain to put on optical discs. But for stuff that is both personal and non-volatile like documents and pictures the set is much smaller and not in flux like the rest of the data so initially a couple of 25 GB M-DISCs and then later maybe an extra disk once a year would do the trick. This would protect the data in a scenario in which my internet connected backup servers somehow got hacked and destroyed. I also like the idea of having this stuff on a different medium than a magnetic disk as is pointed out here by @nickpsecurity.

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          This would protect the data in a scenario in which my internet connected backup servers somehow got hacked and destroyed

          Most cloud storage providers offer you a few options here. The NAS that pushes all of these backups to the cloud for me has a shared access key that doesn’t allow it to delete things, so a compromise would not allow someone to delete things and I can revoke it easily. For extra fun, you can have a small VM that isn’t exposed to the Internet, only to the cloud provider’s back-end services, which runs complex policies such as moving the backed-up blobs to another storage account or duplicating the metadata.

          I also like the idea of having this stuff on a different medium than a magnetic disk

          The archive tier for cloud providers is often tape. Even the storage mechanisms that are disk are usually not just a simple disk storage or even a conventional RAID array, they’re using complex error correcting codes and spreading your data over a load of disks. They’re much more reliable than anything you could affordably build at home. If you want to pay more, you can opt for geographic replication so even if a particular data center is hit by a meteorite or nuclear bomb, your data is still safe somewhere else. I generally consider my data to not be sufficiently important to need to survive a nuclear war, but your threat model may vary.

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            Appreciate the shoutout. Yeah, I lost a lot of data one time due to multiple failures of magnetic disks. Per a 3rd party, turned out to be that they all used the same connector and drivers on a safer system that fed them silent errors. (sighs) So, I say diversify as much as you can without high, maintenance headaches. And some media should be immune to electromagnetic failures.

            That something you’re using is pretty cool, too. :)

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              That something you’re using is pretty cool, too. :)

              thanks! :)

              Now that we have unveil(2) the next major update to snaps can drop all my custom patches to chroot and privdrop rsync, or maybe implement rsyncs “–link-dest” so that I can use the new openrsync. But these are just idea’s for a hypothetical future update. ;)

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          Interesting. I’d appreciate you sharing the experience with an M-DISC based archival setup.

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            Whenever I get that far I’ll try to remember this comment and come back to you. :)

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            My issue with M-DISC is it’s pretty damn hard to find the burners these days.

            If I had a M-DISC Bluray burner, I’d be burning to discs 100%. I would only burn absolutely important data.

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              I was happy to see that at least here in the Netherlands there are enough options to buy one.