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    I’ve been using Hugo as of late due to ox-hugo, which allows me to write blog posts in Emacs’ Org mode. It’s pretty wonderful for tracking WIP posts and what else to write with Org.

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      The other day I was digging into someone’s personal wiki’s implementation and found that they’re using ox-hugo to generate the wiki from their org-roam notes 👏

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        That’s not just anyone - that’s actually the maintainer of org-roam, so it makes sense that they’d use it on a personal wiki as well. Cool find.

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      The article mentions a few old alternatives but not the more recent Zola which is very similar to Hugo but might have a more approachable templating language.

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        Hugo is fast and pretty powerful, but I keep disliking it for two main reasons:

        1. The documentation rarely helps me solve problems, even though my problems are trivial by nature. Try to find a canonical way to show posts grouped by year in Hugo. It took me probably 30 minutes.
        2. Several minor updates in the past broke backwards compatibility. One example is described in this post (not mine).
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          My only real complaint with Hugo is the difficulty in making your own themes. I did not find their documentation for theme-makers to be very helpful at all.

          I understand the concepts of partials and that they piece the page together into different “puzzles” by using variants of a partial, but I don’t understand how to change which page gets which assembled “puzzle”.

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            The first comment on the lwn post has a reference to a themeless setup for Hugo. The themeless theme sets up a barebones Hugo site. It might be helpful in learning theming because there is very little in the templates and css files to it is easier to work with them than more established themes.

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              I actually found creating my own theme pretty straightforward, especially after trying to do it in Pelican. In a simple case you need only two templates (“list” and “single”), as opposed to a dozen in Pelican. Because of this it’s also easier to create a non-blog in Hugo, as many templates required by Pelican stop making any sense when you don’t create a typical blog.

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                I think I just need to start fresh as I think I went about it wrong after looking at what @eb commented. I did some very dirty solutions to get things working early on and I think that is contributing to the current issues.

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                  That’s not true at all, in Pelican you only need index and page templates, everything else can be empty. Explicit is better than implicit so if empty files bother you then you can hide them on your system file browser or something.

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                  My current site is built using Gatsby, which, while cool, is a nightmare to keep updated. I’d heard of Hugo, and figured porting my site would be fairly easy since it’s a single-digit number of blog posts and a super basic stylesheet.

                  After fighting with Hugo and their docs for at least three hours, I gave up and just wrote my own site generator. I’m sure Hugo is great for complex scenarios, as most static site generators probably are, but I wanted a home page, list of posts, a post page, and nice syntax highlighting. I couldn’t manage to get that with Hugo as easily as I thought it could be.

                  On the plus side, my site generator is the only one I’m aware of that uses the same syntax highlighting engine as VS Code, so all my code snippets are now super colorful!

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                    I’m using Hugo for several projects and have a similar experience. I still cannot confidently say I know how to solve the simplest tasks like list posts with some conditions or create an archive page. This is mostly my fault, but Hugo’s documentation does not help.

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                      Would you mind sharing a link to your generator if it is open source?

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                        I still need to get inlining of small assets working, but maybe I can use this as motivation to finish it soon! I’ll reply again once I’ve published it.

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                      Check out Pelican. It’s using Jinja2 for better templating and it’s a really nice templating engine also used by Django.

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                        Django doesn’t actually use Jinja2 (at least not by default, you can configure it to do so) but it’s own templating engine. They are however very similar since Jinja2 is actually modelled after the Django templating engine.

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                      In general with static-site generators, content authors need to be developers, or at least be familiar with using a text editor, Markdown, and Git. However, web host Netlify has an open-source tool called Netlify CMS that allows non-developers to contribute using a WYSIWYG editor — the tool commits to a Git repository behind the scenes.

                      Does anyone have any experience using Netlify CMS or any of the other tools that add a nice UI to a static site generator? I love the premise, but the ability to empower someone who is only comfortable with Microsoft word to change a website is pretty powerful, and that’s what these SSGs seem to be missing.

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                        I’ve tried it once a couple of months ago, but found the experience unpleasant. The whole system is too finicky, the local development did not work without some serious googling (sorry, don’t remember the specifics, but the point is that following the official tutorial did not yield a successful setup).