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Want to share your BSD story? https://runbsd.info/people/

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    I run DragonflyBSD on some production machines. I love their great defaults :)

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      Sounds like a good start for a good story :)

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      Not related to this article in particular, but maybe we need a BSD tag because that tag soup of “dragonflybsd, freebsd, netbsd, openbsd” is pretty silly looking.

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        That would be perfect! How can we add tags?

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          From the about page: “Creating new tags and retiring old tags is done by the community by submitting, discussing, and voting on ‘meta’-tagged requests about them”

          “To propose a tag, post a meta thread with the name and description. Explain the scope, list existing stories that should have been tagged, make a case for why people would want to specifically filter it out, and justify the increased complexity for submitters and mods.”

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        I think I have clicked on all the people there but couldn’t find anyone running NetBSD as their primary operating system. I always enjoyed NetBSD (mostly because it was very small and had easy to match requirements) but haven’t used it in many many years. Does any lobster here uses it as primary?

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          Dave Vollenweider on there runs NetBSD.

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            I do

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              Great! thanks a lot for replying, could your share a bit more about your experiences with it? How does it feel to use it that way, what you like about it… I’d love to hear more :-)

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                For a typical user, if you’re not running the latest hardware it’s ok for basic usage - you get a web browser, play music, edit documents. It’s a bit more work and less friendly to do the initial setup, but perhaps that’s satisfying to accomplish. If your usage is demanding of the OS you will probably find some bugs, but they’re mostly tolerable.

                For me personally, I am involved in development. It’s a much bigger role on my life than an operating system should. Good community, I like being able to accomplish something everyday, hard problems, understanding how stuff works on a deeper level (I had to go into the source code of many non-netbsd projects to get them to build/update, too), and getting something working finally is very satisfying.

                It’s a very simple OS and easy to understand, I feel much more confident using it. I’ve done things that most people would say require a re-install (rm -rf important directories), and recovered easily without a second machine.

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                  Thanks! I think I will buy a little used lenovo and try playing with it again. :-)

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                    cool. we mostly hang out on freenode #netbsd, if you wanna come chat.

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            One of the first I clicked, Tom Smyth on OpenBSD, has a lot of use cases folks might consider. Also suggests more ISP’s could be reducing risk using OpenBSD in more places.

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              Only barely connected, but I also got my start in Redbrick (the networking society he mentions). Albeit, by that point, FreeBSD only existed on one legacy system (which we EOLed when i was an admin). Small world etc.

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              Interesting to see that OpenBSD is the most popular BSD. Is it because people started to value security these days?

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                it’s just that this website is advertised primarily in the OpenBSD circles.

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                  Right, I run OpenBSD on all my computers and I live in OpenBSD bubble. Would love to publish more stories about other BSDs too. :)

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                    There are some cool stories about clusters on FreeBSD, but while the FBSD community is really nice and friendly, Open always felt more intuitive, even when I was coming from Gentoo and Arch. NetBSD has a single selling point: it runs on everything, and I have used it on a niche SBC for exactly that reason.

                    The only BSD outside of Open that I consider running in working situations, things that are public facing or almost public facing, is DragonFly.

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                  Well, lobste.rs has been developed by @jcs so, naturally, OpenBSD has quite a large presence here :^)

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                    I think it’s because it emphasizes simplicity for the user in a way the others don’t quite. That it has the security buzzword helps too.

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                      OpenBSD is my favorite, but, I guess, FreeBSD is more popular, and technically macOS and iOS are from BSD family too, so…

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                        People running the Mac OS platforms are rarely running it for the BSD aspects. If they are running for the underlying OS, more often they think of it as compatible with their Linux boxes.

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                          True.