1. 14
  1.  

  2. 7

    Eshell supports TRAMP! Which means you don’t have to put aside your powerful environment when switching to root or connecting to a remote host: all the power of your Emacs can be used anywhere, the shell included.

    Just reading this isn’t believing it. Just recently, I remotely work on a LaTeX document I had to send someone, but I didn’t have pdflatex installed on my local system (I don’t use it too often, and my harddisk is 36GB). But using Emacs with Org-mode+LaTeX export + AucTeX (for debugging formulas)+eshell+TRAMP by connecting to it nearly felt like I was working on a local system. cp just worked without me noticing, PDFTools were able to open the file without me manually transferring it, etc.

    The downside would then be that some commands behave weirdly. cat won’t close a pipe automatically if the file your reading doesn’t end with a new line, and this is necessary since eshell doesn’t support input redirection via <. But these are all things that can be fixed. Until then, M-x shell works well enough, be it without the level of integrated-ness that eshell can offer.

    1. 1

      Nowadays, I mostly use Windows, but a while back, I was really deep into the Emacs ecosystem, to the point where I considered using it as my window manager. And it was wonderful! If only my operating system were as programmable and discoverable as my text editor.

      1. 1

        What made you go to Windows? Was is job-related or something about Emacs itself?

        1. 1

          No, it’s for a bunch of reasons. Part of it is software that exists nowhere else, like modern PC games. Part of it is the fact that I have Windows 10 Education for free via university, meaning I can disable telemetry :-)

          Emacs itself actually works great under the Windows Subsystem for Linux. The only problem I’ve encountered is that magit is slower than on Linux.

      2. 1

        I just always run into the issue of my eshell buffer becoming huge and getting really slow. I’ve looked online for a way to tell emacs to “chop off” or “empty” the current buffer, with no luck.

        1. 1

          I just always run into the issue of my eshell buffer becoming huge and getting really slow. I’ve looked online for a way to tell emacs to “chop off” or “empty” the current buffer, with no luck.

          I’ve not been an eshell user until I read this article today (we’ll see if I stick with it), but the first thing I tried was the normal emacs editing commands: I selected some text and then hit C-w (kill-region). It did exactly the right thing.

          … and then I discovered that it can only remove the output of a single command at a time. That’s really annoying.

          It does look like killing & recreating the buffer does work. How very annoying; one would have thought that it’d have been fixed by now.