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    Hand-written in x86_64 assembly language

    What is the benefit of doing this, and why should I care?

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      they/him/her boost all their products this way, most popular one is rwasa claiming

      Faster than nginx for most environments

      I always find their product write ups and posts fun to read & interesting.

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        Yeah, they were always neat. Did the hard task of using assembly with the expected benefits. Thanks for sharing.

        Side note: I find collecting these useful for when things like Typed Assembly Language and CoqASM get more mature. While people move anove C for safety, some new projects might move below it for more safety and speed. Imagine crowds’ confused faces when they hear folks were using some assembly for its immunity to common vulnerabilities. Haha.

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          While people move anove C for safety, some new projects might move below it for more safety and speed. Imagine crowds’ confused faces when they hear folks were using some assembly for its immunity to common vulnerabilities. Haha.

          I can imagine that. Usually they would have direct access to any newly developed security measures in hardware. Less abstraction means also less issues caused by leaky/misunderstood abstractions. Additionally in high assurance software, the whole toolchain needs to be verified (ie. DO-178B) - an assembler is easier to pass such criteria than a compiler toolchain.

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            Every one of those is potentially true. You knocked it out the park with that summary!

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        Seems like it would be even more likely to have buffer overflow vulnerabilities than something written in C.

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        OMG this looks so cool!

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          would be nice to try this out, anyone want to join lobsters on 2ton.com.au?

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            You are all alone. :(