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      Absolutely! reStructuredText, MediaWiki, and org-mode are also possibilities. Since pandoc can convert between various lightweight markup, the input source document format is not of huge importance. I’ve found it handy to pass along Markdown documents to people because Markdown is a little less imposing for the uninitiated than AsciiDoc or reStructuredText.

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        incidentally, there was just a new entry posted on front page

        https://lobste.rs/s/y1yn8m/from_python_numpy

        This book looks good, really good, on the web.

        It is written in reStructuredText (although I do not know how exactly math formulas are done) But the source code for the book and commands to generate html from it are also available (so good to learn from) https://www.labri.fr/perso/nrougier/from-python-to-numpy/#about-this-book

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          Ive used Markdown for many years and I really think AsciiDoc is better, even for beginners. Markdown, if you look hard at it, I think isnt really good for anything save the most basic of READMEs or comment formatting. With any sort of proper typesetting Markdown fails horribly. AsciiDoc is not a perfect solution but its certainly closer.

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            To be clear, I use Pandoc-flavoured Markdown, which offers a lot more functionality than what’s specified at https://daringfireball.net/projects/markdown/. I agree that AsciiDoc is superior in many ways to Markdown.

            Do you have some examples where Pandoc’s Markdown cannot be typeset as nicely as AsciiDoc?

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              I cant speak to Pandoc. I avoid it as GitHub doesnt use Pandoc, and I prefer a portable solution. GitHub uses CommonMark and AsciiDoc among others. CommonMark is crippled as I think you would agree.

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        It’s interesting you’re using Context. Here’s is my typesetting script—also based on pandoc—with which I typeset from plain documents, to academic papers with bibliography, to letters. I can also call it from within Vim without leaving it and render a preview. For blogging, I’ve built athena around the same pandoc setup.

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          Looks like your script gets the job done! There are some minor improvements that could be made (such as changing #!/bin/bash to the more portable #!/usr/bin/env bash and eliminating some of the duplication), but probably not worth the effort. Good to see crossref being used. Athena’s really cool–have you considered adding an RSS feed to it?

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            Thanks! WRT bin/env bash and the blatant duplication you’re correct; I’ve thought about both but I also don’t think they’re worth the effort. athena does indeed generate an RSS ATOM feed!

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          This seems really good! I am as it happens in the process of writing a book using markdown and these examples looked way beyond what I thought possible!

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            Thank you for the encouragement! Typesetting Markdown into four unevenly split columns took a fair amount of effort, as did finding a way to distinguish between page-spanning illustrations versus inline vector graphics. It is nice being able to share with people the wide variety of possibilities that a little elbow grease can produce.

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              it’s partly due to me having practical use for things like this, which i guess would be encoruging in a sense. I’m trying to compile a book of sorts. Simultanously as writing the book I will compose algorithms. One piece of code will send data from various datasets and run it through the algorithms. Then it should spit out forms of data.

              So what I am gunning for here is a make based system. Where I could do a make web, for a online demo or make book for pdf files with graphs run with the latest versions and so forth.

              I was expecting to get very rudimentary results, but what you have produced looks really slick! Now it’s a quesstion of finnishing all the ideas on schedule.

              https://github.com/TBF-RnD/alpha (sort of a mess, check out the cleanup branch for a better organized version)

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            The “Prolonged Bombardment” image shows some typographic lapses: A widow at the top right. The top of the text does not align with the text of the title “Prolonged Bombardment”. The text does not align to a baseline grid.

            Ok, baseline grid is something neither TeX nor HTML can do. Scribus can and proprietary tools can.

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              Thanks for pointing these out. The text itself is undergoing revisions, whereupon the widow and top alignment will be resolved. I thought that ConTeXt was capable of grid typesetting (https://wiki.contextgarden.net/Grid_typesetting)? That said, I’m forcing ConTeXt to typeset under rather strict constraints, which may be why the text isn’t aligning to the grid.