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    About two years ago I had a fight with my Linux laptop and decided that was it. I got a MacBook Air, an iPhone, signed up for iCloud, and I have had effectively zero computer or phone troubles since. Maybe it’s just that I’m old now, but I have literally no patience for “fiddling” with my computer any more.

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      That is the complete opposite of what I have experienced. I am forced to use OSX at work and I often feel like throwing the damned iThing out of the window. So many glitches, so many idiosiceasies. So many bugs and things that don’t work. So much crap people accept because apple says so. It.s just absurd.

      If I need to provision a new workstation I can install Linux mint in 10 min. Pull my very basic set up script and I am ready to go in 15 min. Including installing my preferred tools and my configs.

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        Well that is their deal, isn’t it? Resign your (software) freedoms an we will take care of you.

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          Yeah, I guess I’m just no longer certain I gave up anything of value. Like, thinking back, I’m not sure I ever actually benefited from running a FOSS operating system. I suppose I benefited (and still do) from the existence of desktop Linux, to the extent that it provides a check on Microsoft and Apple, but even then, I’m uncertain.

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            I’m not sure I ever actually benefited from running a FOSS operating system

            That is a real problem, I think. Free Software operating systems should make it as easy and accessible as possible to use the freedoms they formally grant their users, but sadly a lot of the software infrastructure does not encourage it. You end up with all the downsides of FOSS (lack of resources for “professional” development), and none of the up-sides.

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              Part of the problem, I think, is fairly mundane: extension points have become the norm for software (and to some extent, at least in the Unix world, always were). I don’t need to modify the source code when I can simply write a script of some kind to scratch the itch I want scratched. In this sense, the FOSS world has started to fall behind, with, for example, Gnome changing its extension APIs all the time (at least for awhile there, not sure what the situation is like now). Apple, on the other hand, has maintained a pretty impressive level of backward compatibility in both Automator and AppleScript, in addition to shipping standard tools like Bash.

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        Classic Linux distros just aren’t made for the casual user, but that’s ok. I don’t think they should be. Sharp tools require a willingness to invest time in learning them. Not everyone can do that, and not everyone who can do so would actually want to. So let’s forget about desktop Linux and relegate that tired phrase to the dustbin of history.

        A more interesting goal would be a desktop appliance powered by free software, and I think the way you might get it right now is to start with Lineage or one of the other AOSP builds. There’s literally a free software powered appliance computer ready to happen; someone just needs the wherewithal to make it. Suppose, a commodity x86 system running an OS derived from AOSP, perhaps with a Windows emulation layer for running legacy proprietary Windows applications?

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          Perhaps having Wine and such running on Haiku?

          Much as I love Linux and for what it’s achieved, “the little kernel that could”, I’m done with some aspects of it and wish it could be replaced on the desktop.

          Haiku must be the little desktop OS that actually puts up a fight, but it can’t unless it runs 100% of the Linux apps.

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            The thing with Haiku is the development is so… random? People just pick up projects, maintain them for a bit, go do something else. It’s not a very structured development environment to base the future of desktop computing on.

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              Lost my reply… All this just feels like a sad state of affairs cuz Linux is hard to fix for the desktop, especially for the mostly useless Unix features, and the only one who kinda did it is Apple :/

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            Suppose, a commodity x86 system running an OS derived from AOSP, perhaps with a Windows emulation layer for running legacy proprietary Windows applications?

            Win32 is the Linux stable ABI. I suspect you’d get OS/2’d pretty quickly.

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            There’s also a more updated (2019) video interview from TFIR where Linus talks about the desktop: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mysM-V5h9z8

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              Honestly at this point I just want to avoid the whole desktop / window manager nonsense on linux. Just provide developers access to the full screen and run only 1 app at a time. Have the ability to switch between multiple terminals in VGA but when you run a gui command give it access to the whole framebuffer kinda like dos games.

              EDIT: It is actually possible. Checkout this talk.