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    Why does this need to be a new distribution? It’s Ubuntu with a different default DE/WM, right?

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      The same reason why I might use spacemacs instead of emacs, I suppose. Because I’ve done a lifetime’s worth of ultimately worthless tweaking already.

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        It doesn’t / isn’t really. There’s a ppa you can just add to an existing install and get the same result.

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          I rather think Alan Pope among others has a good point. There has been a lot of effort put into making it easy to roll new distributions, and way not enough into making it easy to create end user applications on the Linux platform.

          The result is a plethora of varyingly pointless distributions but giant gaps in end user applicaiton space.

          Personally I think better support for dynamic languages would help a LOT (I know this will undoubtedly draw out hte C/C++/Rust crowd who will tell me that low level programming isn’t hard, missing the point that I simply don’t enjoy it that much :)

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        I’ve been using this for about a month and installed it on top of vanilla ubuntu 19.04 rather than using the regolith distribution (I’m not sure why it needs to be a new distribution). Long story short, I ended up changing the color scheme, switching from st to kitty, broke the pretty i3 bar with a dist-upgrade, and probably would have been better off just doing all of this myself.

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          But that kind of makes it interesting for me, as I have no desire to fiddle around on my work machine. But I had to a little when I installed it. (Been using i3 for a while, but I also wanted some DE integration, so having KDE Plasma as well and it’s not 100% perfect).

          So I might give this a shot and live with “only 90% what I love, but at leasti t works in a non wonky way”

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            How does the integration with Gnome’s control center look like?

            The best thing about Gnome are all the things working together; the screen lock, the keyboard layouts, the printers, the plug-and-play displays. I prefer using tiling window managers but I invariable end-up re-creating a lot of these things, half baked.

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              I really wish the major DEs would add a tiling mode. I really like tilling window managers but I also really like Gnome. I’ve tried a few of the tiling extensions but they all kinda suck and feel kludgey and really don’t like that I have one of my monitors oriented vertically. If Gnome had an option to force windows to tile instead of float I’d be a happy person.

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                Myself I find that “corner snapping” is all tiling I want in my life, and MATE does that just fine.

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                  I use XFCE + i3, works pretty well. You can just disable the window manager and start i3 and it works. Not sure if that would work for you (see https://github.com/benoncoffee/archlinuxconfig for the installation, dotfiles, etc.).

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                  Excellent, actually. Everything works – from screen lock to display. No arandr or half-baked scripts. This is a really redeeming point that I didn’t even think about. The fact that I missed this illustrates how seamless it is. I suppose I also haven’t had to make any scripts for the bar either, which is nice

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                does it worth to use this distro over ubuntu+ vanilla i3wvm? different configuration files can be annoying? what’s the “plus”? I ask without knowing and testing the use of regolith-linux.

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                  I’m not sure why it needs to be a new distribution either. The original configuration file was located in ~/.config/i3-regolith/config and a recent dist-upgrade broke the configuration file location and created new dist-specific files in i3-regolith, which broke i3.

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                  I’ve recently been “ricing” (customizing) my Ubuntu install at work. I strongly suggest doing it yourself, a little bit at a time. It gives you time to understand all the components, making the components easier to use and debug.

                  TBH, I don’t see the big efficiency improvements from using a tiling window manager. It’s nice to not have to worry about resizing. All my windows are full screen or split into two. That’s mostly it. I found it irritating how much time it took and anxiety it caused when I was trying to figure out where the hell my windows were on Mac.

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                    I actually noticed a big difference when switching from GNOME to i3. Putting certain windows in the same workspaces everyday helps you navigate to the windows you want faster.

                    Do I need to chat with someone? Meta+3 because all my chat applications are on my 3rd workspace. Need to write some code? IDE and terminals are on Meta+2.

                    I’ve been dual booting Windows 10 and Linux+i3 for a few years now and I’ve noticed that I’m a lot more efficient when using i3.

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                      It has been nice having fixed workspaces. But I had the same setup on my Mac. Three workspaces: terminal, browser, xcode. The two at the ends were full-screen. The browser workspaces sometimes got heavily overloaded - too many Finder windows and other crap to worry about. Perhaps because I do so much in my browser and my terminal, I feel less of an overload now. Funny enough, I have “window managers” for the browser (tabs) and the terminal (tmux).

                      You are right though. Now I have two terminal workspaces with tmux, the middle one with the browser, the next one with the music player and a terminal dedicated to config files, and finally the last workspace for my personal browser.

                      Not having to manage overlapping windows reduces cognitive load, too.