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    This is exactly on the money. With Marzipan, the message from Apple can easily be interpreted as “we don’t want great Mac apps on the Mac, we want apps on the Mac”. The folks who wrote that Electron was a scourge should be considering this scourge alongside it.

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      The folks who wrote that Electron was a scourge should be considering this scourge alongside it.

      Quote from the article that called Electron a scourge:

      Even Apple, of all companies, is shipping Mac apps with glaring un-Mac-like problems. The “Marzipan” apps on MacOS 10.14 Mojave — News, Home, Stocks, Voice Memos — are dreadfully bad apps. They’re functionally poor, and design-wise foreign-feeling. I honestly don’t understand how Apple decided it was OK to ship these apps.

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      macOS Mojave shipped with four native apps that Apple had ported over from iOS. These apps were clearly examples intended to incentivize third-party creators into using the new API. Sadly, they were terrible.

      I’d recommend adding a link – I don’t know anything about these apps, and it’s hard to relate to the post without having seen them.

      Edit: found some examples elsewhere.

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        Yea I guess the OP could have added screenshots to illustrate. That blog layout is super weird too. My desktop doesn’t need a mobile column width!

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          My desktop doesn’t need a mobile column width!

          Ironically, an example of the desktop version suffering for the sake of mobile compatibility, just like Marzipan ;-)

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        I think this article is spot on as well. When I saw the announcement, I personally viewed it as Apple crying uncle and all but abdicating the desktop space to Windows.

        And, truth be told, I think that’s the correct business decision for them to make. However, it’s an awful technical decision, and an even more awful decision if you are emotionally or fiscally invested in the Mac as a platform.

        Anyone who has been watching the Mac desktop application market with any degree of pragmatism at all can’t help but notice that long time stalwart players like Omnifocus, Panic and Rogue Amoeba have been at the very least shifting focus to include the mobile space. Desktop Mac apps don’t make any money to speak of, because the number of people who buy and use Macs and actually care enough to seek out third party applications is small in market terms and dwindling further by the minute.

        This is all part and parcel, as I see it, of the decline and slow death of general purpose computing. Most people don’t need or want an actual Mac with actual Mac apps. They want something like a tablet with an indestructible work environment that they don’t need to think about or maintain.

        Whether Apple merges OSX and IOS eventually is a secondary question - the fact is that they’re making OSX more and more IOS-like over time, and have publicly indicated that this trend will continue and accelerate.

        So, I applaud the authors for calling Apple on the fact that this is a weasel-y move, and that they’re garrotting their own platform, but being surprised that this is happening or expecting anything different is another story altogether.

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          The iOS mobile space is a decade old, and massive, so it certainly makes sense for Mac stalwarts to explore it. But it’s also worth looking at what’s worked and what hasn’t.

          Omni has definitely had good success on iOS, though their Mac products are also still going very strong. Panic has devoted significant efforts to iOS, but scaled back (see https://panic.com/blog/the-2017-panic-report/ and https://panic.com/blog/the-future-of-transmit-ios/), as those efforts have not met with the hoped-for revenue. At Rogue Amoeba, we’ve had 2 small iOS apps since 2008, and very poor experiences on the platform. Only Airfoil Satellite remains, and it’s a companion to a paid Mac app. We still devote almost 100% of our resources to the Mac platform, and employee 10 people full time.

          “Desktop Mac apps don’t make any money to speak of, because the number of people who buy and use Macs and actually care enough to seek out third party applications is small in market terms and dwindling further by the minute.”

          I’m curious how you’d supporting that statement. Omni still has strong Mac sales, while both Panic and Rogue Amoeba make nearly all, or all, of our revenue from the Mac platform, and support dozens of employees. Beyond us, there are hundreds of other Mac software companies out there, from Bare Bones to Flying Meat to Red Sweater, and many more.

          One can certainly debate whether the Mac ecosystem is growing, stagnating, or even shrinking. It’s also indeed worth considering how Marzipan will impact the platform in the future. However, the idea that Mac apps “don’t make any money to speak of” is simply incorrect.

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            One can certainly debate whether the Mac ecosystem is growing, stagnating, or even shrinking. It’s also indeed worth considering how Marzipan will impact the platform in the future. However, the idea that Mac apps “don’t make any money to speak of” is simply incorrect.

            First off, thank you for your reply! If anyone could be said to be an expert in the Mac third party software business, it’s you :)

            I’m gonna put myself up here as a prime example of jumping to a conclusion without any real evidence based on what I saw as mounting evidence but really wasn’t.

            I could cite a number of anecdotal, possibly unconnected facts that feel related - among them Apple’s decisions trending towards locking down MacOS X in favor of consumer safety, but ultimately I have no actual data to back up my assertions.

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          These miss the point. Microsoft said they could do it. Unless Apple does the same, they are seen as obsolete. The bar to beat was Microsoft, and they did so.

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            I don’t think this article misses the point at all. They’re just making a different point from the one you’re making. From a business perspective? Sure. All the major vendors like MS and Apple are in a race for the bottom of the general purpose computing ecosystem war, but the author is saying that the Mac platform represented a high bar of usability and richness which Apple is giving up on with this move, and that’s worth taking careful note of.

            It’s a sad day, but an inevitable one as I see it given the current business and market climate.

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              It will be interesting to see who fills the void. Maybe some company quietly built on Linux…