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    If you’re willing to stick to Postgres, Postmodern’s S-SQL SQL generation library is far more complete than cl-dbi’s companion library SxQL appears to be.

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      The only real quibble I have with this set of recommendations is that, if you’re writing GUI apps and/or want a GUI-style IDE for development, you might consider buying a license for LispWorks (or trying out the free Personal Edition, if it fits your needs). Its IDE is a lot more like what most people expect IDEs to be, compared to trying to get a non-Emacs user to pick up Emacs+SLIME. And in my opinion its GUI libraries are a lot nicer than CommonQt, especially for cross-platform development and delivery. The obvious downsides are that it costs money, and ties you to LispWorks as your Lisp implementation.

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        I recently picked up a copy of LW, and accordingly started playing with CAPI. It’s maybe one of the more pleasant experiences I’ve had doing GUI programming; I was rather dismayed to find Qt as the recommended GUI toolkit in this list. It’s probably my least favourite of the lot, though that experience is all in Go, Python, C, and C++.

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          Silly question, isn’t LW GUI toolkit based or inspired by CLIM?

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            LW does have a CLIM implementation, but it’s intended for legacy applications written back when CLIM had legs. Their main/recommended GUI toolkit is CAPI, which has a more conventional design. CLIM was an attempt to rethink the GUI programming model, while CAPI is just a nice set of cross-platform GUI bindings, with a model similar to the underlying native GUI toolkits that it uses.

            Although “just” maybe is underselling it a bit, because that in itself is pretty unusual: there aren’t that many cross-platform, native-look-and-feel GUI toolkits that actually work.

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              Indeed there aren’t. I’ve often described Tk as the only one; making it feel native is a little extra effort, but nowhere near as much as Gtk+ or Qt need. It’s going to be nice getting back into CL long enough to look into CAPI, then. :)

              CLIM had some very neat abstractions. It would be nice to know more about why it never made it; I know people wanted it badly at one point.

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                There was a recent discussion in reddit about it, if you’re interested: https://www.reddit.com/r/lisp/comments/3i36rn/status_of_mcclim/

                I too wanted to play a bit with it, I find a bit surprising how there’s no development in such an interesting project.

                I think the most active repo is this one: https://github.com/robert-strandh/McCLIM