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    I had no idea what searx was, and the article doesn’t explain it or link to it. After examining the URL, I found my way here: https://asciimoo.github.io/searx/

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      I clicked the “Home” button at the top-left of the page and it worked pretty well.

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        Ah, I was on mobile (the navigation links don’t appear).

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      Do you run your own, OP?

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        Yes, on my local machine. :)

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          I dont get it. According to searx home page

          Users are neither tracked nor profiled.

          Since you’re probably the sole user of your local machine, arent all the aggregated search engines able to track you?

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            No, because all session info are cut from requests. Only the IP address is visible, but it is not possible to profile users based on IPs. If someone wants to hide his/her IP, he/she can configure proxy for searx or use it over Tor. Also, searx does not store session info and does not profiles its users.

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              it is not possible to profile users based on IPs

              Why not? I don’t think it would be difficult (especially for the likes of Google) to build profiles based on IP, or to differentiate searches from shared IPs, or to make best guesses (based on similar search terms using the same ISP for example) at who someone is if their dynamic IP changes.

              If it isn’t possible, and maintaining session info is the only way Google can profile you, why not just use a browser addon to delete any cookies and rewrite the URLs to remove the unique identifiers?

              If someone wants to hide his/her IP, he/she can configure proxy for searx or use it over Tor.

              Using Tor could help, but how many searx setups are configured to do this? You wouldn’t want to be the only one hitting certain APIs over Tor, as then any requests to those that comes from a Tor exit is almost guaranteed to be you.