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    I’d be curious to know what information is available about the discovery of such devices in the wild. How many Airbnb’s do I need to stay at to find a hidden camera?

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      Me too, I’d be also quite interested in the geographical distribution of such devices!

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      The device I made, Radio instigator, is able to get into wireless networks, full network reconnaissance scans, along with SDR scans from 24MHz to 1.7GHz. And combined with Salamandra, you can also find non-networked audio transmitters.

      Overview: https://hackaday.com/2019/06/05/mobile-sigint-hacking-on-a-civilians-budget/

      Repo: https://gitlab.com/crankylinuxuser/siginttablet

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        Note that finding a camera on the network is not a guarantee you’re being spied on. Could just be a security cam.

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          I’m pretty sure most renters who put up cameras do it for security purposes, not to capture n00ds. But from the perspective of the person being filmed, it’s moot. The invasion of privacy is the same.

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            What if the camera is on the outside of the house? Or in the shared hallway? Or some other public(ish) location?

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              At least here in Sweden, such an arrangement requires clear signage.

              I mean, I’d be “ok” if the rental agreement stated that the premises were under 24hr video surveillance by the owners. I’d not rent the property but at least it would be up front.

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                Then, they can show you that if you ask about it. If they don’t, then they might be up to something.

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                The invasion of privacy is the same.

                It’s only an invasion of privacy if you didn’t agree to it or didn’t know about it, and/or there was some expectation of privacy to begin with. Security cameras are generally not hidden and generally monitor public space, and usually there is no expectation of privacy in a public space.

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                  The point of the linked article is to detect and find surveillance devices that are not visible.

                  “Public space” is a bit mutable in a rented area, but I’d consider the bathroom and bedroom to be private, even if they’re rented. Yes, a renter might say they want to keep those spaces under surveillance to detect and prove breaches of the contract, but unless this is explicitly agreed upon beforehand it would be considered an invasion of privacy to have such devices installed.

                  And again, good luck renting out your AirBnB with the provision that you have cameras in the bedrooms and bathrooms.

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              Another method: keep a device connected to the network for a while, the do an ARP scan.

              This will show you the MAC addresses of some devices that talked onto the local network, which you will be able to use to show the brand of the devices.

              An OUI table or dedicated tools will help making the conversion.

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                netdiscover does this.

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                  And the source data is here: http://standards-oui.ieee.org/oui/oui.txt

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                  This would make for a decent consumer product.

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                  Here’s a tip: if you’re thinking about a short-term rental of someone’s private property but worry that they are going to film you to make their own porn, perhaps a simpler solution than “hey learn how to scan a network for data packets” is “stop fooling yourself that renting someone’s private house/apartment for two days is a good idea”.

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                    “stop fooling yourself that renting someone’s private house/apartment for two days is a good idea”.

                    How did you come to this conclusion? where’s your data? did you have bad experiences? is this something that you’ve actually thought about for more than 15 seconds straight? or should we assume that was a knee-jerk reaction kind of opinion?

                    I’m not a big fan of Airbnb because of the issues with rent prices and gentrification they’re causing across European cities, but so far my experience renting the private houses/apartments of others often in the range of 2 days, and renting out my own while traveling has been pretty positive. Obviously my opinion is purely anecdotal, so I’m looking forward to hear your non anecdotal reasoning since you seem so confident that it’s not a good idea.

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                      If you need some deep explanation about why trusting some stranger to provide you accomodation for a short term is less safe than trusting a regulated business to do the same, I can’t help you.

                      Airbnb is to Hotels what Uber is to taxis, and Uber is basically hitchhiking but you pay for the privilege.

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                        If you need some deep explanation about why trusting some stranger to provide you accomodation for a short term is less safe than trusting a regulated business to do the same, I can’t help you.

                        This is not what you were claiming. 97% safety is less than 98%, but both might still be relatively safe. You are claiming it’s a bad idea. Also a constructive explanation doesn’t have to be a deep dive. It seems you can’t properly articulate the reasons for your opinion, which is okay, but then you might be in no place to make a sober judgement about how good or bad something is.

                        For the record, said stranger has to trust you with their house as well. Financially Airbnb is more of a security risk to the host, than it is for the guest, or at least that was my experience.

                        Airbnb is to Hotels what Uber is to taxis, and Uber is basically hitchhiking but you pay for the privilege.

                        This has nothing to do with the topic, but I find it incorrect nonetheless. I’ve hitched-hiked a plenty, short distance, long distance, and across borders in both Europe and Africa. I sometimes had to wait hours or days, walk for kilometers next to the highway to reach the next gas station or shop, and change course completely just to get a ride. I never had to do any of that with Uber.

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                          It’s a completely unregulated business model, that specifically works by breaking laws in the name of profits.

                          For the record, said stranger has to trust you with their house as well.

                          That would be a reason that letting strangers into your house for short stays is fucking stupid. Which it is, but that isn’t what the article is about.

                          I sometimes had to wait hours or days, walk for kilometers next to the highway to reach the next gas station or shop, and change course completely just to get a ride.

                          Congratulations, you’ve successfully missed the entire fucking point. Have a gold star.

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                            For the record, said stranger has to trust you with their house as well.

                            That would be a reason that letting strangers into your house for short stays is fucking stupid. Which it is

                            No more than, say, letting strangers run code on your computer. Yet we all do that every day.

                            In practice, there’re not complete “strangers” in the sense of “random person”. There are trust systems in the form of reviews. It’s not perfect, but does make a significant impact, since you won’t be able to rent out your place if you get a bunch of negative reviews. So replying to your other comment (“hotel management/owners and staff all have a vested interest in preventing it from happening”), AirBnB landlords have just as much a vested interest in preventing stuff like this from happening as hotel management: they will lose business.

                            Are there bad or sketchy AirBnB hosts? Undoubtedly. But then again, there are also bad or sketchy hotels, and if you’re a bit careful it’s not too hard to avoid either.

                            On a deeper level, we all have to choose if we want to live our lives in perpetual fear of “strangers”, or just accept that sometimes we have a negative experience. My personal experiences with letting strangers stay at my house (mostly through CouchSurfing) have been overwhelmingly positive, and my life would be poorer if I hadn’t. It would be foolish to be naïve, but turns out most people aren’t all that bad.

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                              Does regulation prevent someone from installing hidden cameras? There’s certainly evidence against it. But if you want to tell a few fucking people to fucking fuck off, because they’re fucking fucktards and fucking disagree with you, that’s fucking alright.

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                                It creates strong incentives for those running the business to prevent such occurrences.

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                            The idea that hotels, taxis, etc., are inherently more reputable than “strangers” strikes me as a naive stance. Here in Montreal, taxi drivers have long had scummy practices, including pretending their credit card machines aren’t working and offering to drive you to an ATM machine.

                            The only reason governments crack down on Uber, Airbnb, etc., is probably the money they get from taxi/hotel permits and whatever else ancillary fees.

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                              This can also happen at a hotel, as stated in the article.

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                                And the hotel management/owners and staff all have a vested interest in preventing it from happening.

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                            mirrors will reflect IR, so a hot spot on a mirror may be from a ceiling light not from a camera behind it

                            I would have thought that this should be fairly easy to distinguish by moving the IR camera: an IR reflection should move around the mirror like a visible reflection would, while a hotspot behind the mirror should stay put.

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                              Fing is a decent Android/iOS app that does most of this. You can see which devices on a network respond and then run a port scan, all through a fairly decent gui.

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                                Always remember to look in your saxaphone too. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o8-i7lA5gic

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                                  And if we applied these practices to normal hotels, what do you think would happen?

                                  I get that tying this to AirBNB is trendy, and maybe a bit more practically useful, but one of the things we’ve learned is that having a reputation for probity is no guarantee of actual behavior.