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    This is so close to a project I’ve wanted to do myself: in Judaism, a day begins at sunset, and the day is divided into twelve variable hours that run sunset to sunrise, and twelve variable hours that run sunrise to sundown. I’ve long wanted to build a clock that works this way, with the hands running faster or slower depending on the time of day and the season, but watchmaking is far outside my skills. But doing a variant of this might just be something I can actually pull off.

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      The Japanese used to keep time in a similar way, as a sunrise to sunset measure. I saw an exhibit at a museum in Tokyo on analog clocks which tracked the date to correctly render the time. Quite amazing machines.

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        It should be possible to get a smart watch and create a custom face for it.

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        Setting the technical bit aside (which is cool too) - its so pretty!

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          Yeah but don’t look at the price

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          Very beautiful.

          I wonder what such a clock would be like here in the north, where the day portion of a nychthemeron is very long in the summer and very short in the winter. :)

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            Nevertheless, the solution I used was to mark the beginning and end of the day at the point where the Sun is closest to the horizon. This makes the solution continuous, in the sense that a person observing the clock while moving north into the Arctic circle at certain times of the year would see the day progress bar advance normally, while the sunset indicator would move toward either 0 or 100 before vanishing altogether.

            The sunset indicator is moving around, but the progress bar should still take 24 hours to go around.

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            Very cool, both at a technical and aesthetic level! One question: you said that the zero-point is sunrise, but if the sunset is marked by the blue dot, what does the 100 indicate? Midnight?

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              100 is tomorrow’s sunrise, and when the progress bar will roll over. Other interesting points in time: solar noon is halfway between zero and the blue dot, solar midnight is halfway between 100 and the blue dot.

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                I suppose that would be the next sunrise?

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                This is so interesting. It looks like something I’d like to build at some point, if only to recreate that rather relaxing devil-may-care attitude towards time and punctuality (generally speaking) that’s seen in some undeveloped countries. What’s that you say? I’m 10 minutes late? …so?

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                  You are allowed to be relaxed about time and punctuality! It is not a sign of being undeveloped¹! It’s just a reflection of what you currently value (which is also formed by context and people around you)! Probably you are already relaxed about time in some situations, and stressed about it in others!

                  ¹What does ‘undeveloped’ even mean? There are many things it can mean. It’s one of those words you should really only use as a shorthand in a long-running communcation, when you’ve already reached consensus on what it means here.

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                    You are allowed to be relaxed about time and punctuality! It is not a sign of being undeveloped¹!

                    It’s probably just me, but I don’t look at being “underdeveloped” (my definition, anyway :/) as a bad thing!

                    It’s just a reflection of what you currently value (which is also formed by context and people around you)!

                    Possibly, but (again, generally speaking) it’s not easy to be very relaxed on time in the UK/US, in my experience (but looking at jtm’s comment, this is apparently not the case everywhere). The meetup is at 1440, sir. 1400 is 1400, not 1445!

                    What does ‘undeveloped’ even mean?

                    Yeah, I should have been more specific :/ By “undeveloped” I don’t mean “poor” or “third-world”, I mean more rural-type areas where the majority of the population is engaged in blue-collar work.

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                    interesting. It looks like something I’d like to build at some point, if only to recreate that rather relaxing devil-may-care attitude towards time and punctuality (generally speaking) that’s seen in some undeveloped countries. What’s that you say? I’m 10

                    I’m not at all opposed to this, but at the same time I feel like parties who are often 10 minutes late come across as caring very little about wasting the time of other people.

                    I suppose the natural solution to this is to adjust one’s expectations for party’s who are oftentimes late… but I suppose my own concern for potentially wasting their time holds me back from doing so.

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                      I feel like parties who are often 10 minutes late come across as caring very little about wasting the time of other people.

                      I think this feeling is largely cultural. In Brazil, punctuality feels much less important compared to the US or UK. In fact, there’s a phrase “horário britânico”, which means “British time”, used to describe something punctual.

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                        Hah – maybe that’s it, given I’m a Brit!

                        That’s interesting to know, thanks for sharing.

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                      I think one can be relaxed about timescales and timetables while still being punctual when an event is scheduled for a specific time, IMHO.

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                      This reminds me of an extension for WMI (later WMII, nowadays people rather use i3), that showed the percentage of time left until a certain, configurable point of the day. I used it to show me the percentage of my workday.

                      It also reminds me of .beat time or Swatch Internet Time which divides the day in thousand parts called beats.

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                        It’s not highlighted very much in the post, except for a single “Buy” button under the image, but you can also purchase this.

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                          The YES wristwatch has the concept of showing local sunrise and sunset too: https://www.yeswatch.com/wrist-watch/worldwatch/worldwatchV7-collection.html?id=auJvRkID

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                            I’m thinking, this could be also an interesting watchface for a smartwatch. Too bad my Versa died 2 weeks ago.

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                              Hey, I have this bookmarked! It was from when I was researching whether it’d be feasible to build a solar-powered battery-less e-ink alarm clock that was roughly shaped like this one: https://www.pinterest.com.au/pin/42784265197266034/

                              (I’m going to use this comment as an excuse to describe my concept, in case it’s interesting to someone.)

                              My thinking was that solar panels degrade really slowly (0.3% per year, apparently - and (99.7%^100 = 74%) while (100% - (0.3%*100) =70%, whichever one applies) so unless that becomes irrelevant at longer timescales you only need ~1.33x the solar cells to be still functional for the next century), so perhaps it’d be possible to make an alarm clock that was self-sufficient for literally a century without breaking down. An “heirloom clock”, if you will.

                              While obviously a solar-powered alarm clock with a lithium battery and a chunk of solar cells would be viable, because clocks with normal non-rechargeable batteries last literal years, batteries break too quickly so if possible you’d want to use capacitors instead.

                              The clock would also need to charge from indirect sunlight to be at all reliable, given that most people don’t have perfectly sunny bedside tables, which means you need to add a whole lot more solar panels than is strictly necessary for the best-case scenario. An order of magnitude difference, apparently.

                              Plus, the clock’s power supply would need to be able to handle more than just the screen updates - it’d need to beep the alarm and have a light so it’s visible in darkness.

                              E-ink possibly isn’t the best choice for this, but 1) the original alarm clock’s time-display isn’t visible while lying down, and I suspect this is a deliberate choice to avoid glowing onto a sleeping person’s face when they first open their eyes, and 2) aesthetics is definitely a factor here, and e-ink is definitely the best choice aesthetically. Aesthetics is the main reason I bookmarked this project incidentally (that wooden shell is amazing!), despite its “solar” being nothing to do with PV.

                              Sadly, e-ink screens don’t last long enough for this concept to be viable - there are ~500 000 minutes in a year, and e-ink screens last less than 5 million refreshes. That means the screen won’t even last the decade before it needs replacing.

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                                This is beautiful, if I could afford to buy one I would on impulse.

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                                  Making up for lost time at the camp? ;)

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                                    The Android app “Suntimes” has a widget that is kind of like this. It shows a bar that is divided into night and day sections, with some bars at the beginning and end for twilights, and shows an indicator for where you are in the bar right now. You can see it at the beginning of this screenshot.