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I’m interested in reading more about databases. I was reading the article posted here and realized that I am part of the small margin of developers who don’t understand databases that well.

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    Transaction Processing by Gray and Reuter is probably my favorite database book, but it may not be the best first book. Ullman et al.’s Database Systems: The Complete Book or various forms of it (as long as they have the database implementation parts) might be a better place to start. The red book: http://www.redbook.io/ and the papers listed here are also great: https://github.com/rxin/db-readings

    Some of this stuff might seem intimidating at first, but I think a lot of database texts suffer from the opposite problem: they skim over how the database is actually implemented, which is a crucial part of understanding databases; otherwise you end up with this “databases are magic boxes” mindset.

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      I am part of the small margin of developers who don’t understand databases that well.

      I wouldn’t feel too bad–most everyone doesn’t really know how they work or what they can do (myself included).

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        I’m not the author , but I’m also not an expert. I don’t feel especially bad about it, but it would be to go from “I know enough to write a query if I need to, with some head scratching” to “I know the theory, implementation, and tradeoffs. If I needed to, I could design one.”

        I’d be happy to see some good references as well.

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        Jeffrey D. Ullman Principles of Database & Knowledge-Base Systems, Vol. 1: Classical Database Systems

        Ralph Kimball The Data Warehouse Toolkit: The Definitive Guide to Dimensional Modeling

        David C. Hay Data Model Patterns

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          An Introduction to Database Systems by C. J. Date