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    The irony is presumably lost on them that this post has a yellow call-to-action banner to buy their book stuck to the top of the screen, and a pop-over newsletter sign-up form when you scroll down the page.

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      You read my mind :x

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      This is a big problem with, for example, smart appliances in cultures where they are occasionally forbidden. The appliances continue being smart when their owners want them to be dumb. An example is the religious Jewish sector that can’t use smart fridges on Saturdays. Either the religion needs to end (unlikely) or smart products need to be capable of respecting end user wishes (slightly more likely).

      Appliances are all moving towards smart. It’s time they also started acting more like assistants with specific jobs, instead of an angry mob.

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        Don’t underestimate the ingenuity of rule-bending in religious communities:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KosherSwitch

        That said, if manufacturers were forced to sell non-smart products for religious markets that would be a big win for all consumers.

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          Notably there is a massive section of the community that refuses that particular product because it bends the rules too far.

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          But this won’t happen, because technical users like us will turn all the smarts off forever because we don’t want advertisements on our fridge, or our TV recording our viewing habits and listening to the room so Samsung can make an extra $5 a month on improving the accuracy of our digital doppelganger.

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          Funny that they didn’t link to: https://calmtech.com/

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            In Android you have a greater degree of notification control than in iOS, where it’s just an “all or nothing” approach.

            For example, Tinder sends you a lot of annoying notifications, and “you have a new message” is the only truly useful one. I could disable all the spam ones in Android, but can’t with my iPhone where it’s an all-or-nothing approach (one of the many reasons I don’t like iPhone at all).