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Hi There, This might sound a little out of context but have you ever used programming to generate cool artwork or art visual. If so how did you do it and what was your process of generating that artwork

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    Yes plenty of times. I’ve used Processing (and its Clojure variant Quil). My process is usually to sketch with pen and paper first, then try to implement something sort of similar, and play around with it -> iterate on the code until I think it looks good :)

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      I’m a big fan of creating little generative art toys with Javascript. A little neglected, but I have a collection of toy examples that might be interesting to you: Sketches and their code

      Matt DesLauriers does a lot of generative art, and he created a great lib for scaffolding a simple environment (JS): canvas-sketch

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        Tyler Hobbs has a fantastic series of essays on how he uses Quil to do do his generative art. I also find a lot of his art is incredible.

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          The demoscene http://www.pouet.net/ has some brilliant example of this.

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            Whats this looks like a news aggregator

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              Pouet is an aggregator for the demoscene https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demoscene. Demos are like videos but made via programming often with extreme limitations (i.e. under 4kb in size).

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            Not sure if you just mean still images here, but when I started programming in QBASIC, I tried to copy some classic demo effects. So in that case there wasn’t really a ‘creative process’. Later, I have mostly obtained pretty pictures as a byproduct of computational coding (Mandelbrot, Buddhabrot, strange attractors, solutions of a differential equation, a fractal based on the convergence of some mathematical process, see http://paulbourke.net/fractals/newtonraphson/, or applications other mathematical concepts). Also I made the background I currently use when I was messing with HSL/HSV/RGB color space conversions: https://i.imgur.com/sYwharI.png.

            For inspiration, you might want to check out Inigo Quilez site and youtube channel (and possibly shadertoy). I remember he has nice templates to generate images, video, (maybe sound as well).

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              Is it misguided to ask the philosophical question what constitutes art and how do you know if you’re doing art or just crafting or building something?

              But if it’s just about something visual? I used to be big into a digital art community in the late 90s, early 00s. If you’re mean you could say we were a bunch of kids playing with photoshop. But that’s not the point - I kept in touch with a few of those (at least for 10 years) and there was a really clear split. Some became artists (according to my definition) - digital artists, photographers, some designers and some became programmers. It was kind of a clear split. I don’t remember many who would fit your definition from this bunch.

              That said, I’ve always been jealous of demoscene people, sadly I never managed to go into that direction, but it’s just so arcane and I don’t feel up for the task of even starting to dig in.

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                That’s how I started, using Scratch over a decade ago. Most of it was simplistic random walkers that painted coloured lines a background (I called them “Pollock Simulators”). If I were do so something like that again, I’d probably take a look at Racket’s graphics libraries.

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                    Yes -

                    https://github.com/robmyers/

                    I’ve used many languages and environments. I think that Common Lisp and JavaScript are my favourites.

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                      I have spent a lot of time watching The Coding Train, its a YouTube channel where created by Associate Arts Professor Daniel Shiffman. There he teaches a lot about generative art using either Processing or p5.js.

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                        Oh nice thanks for sharing I’ll definitely check him out

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                          Yes, several examples but the most novel is probably “WadC” - a programming language for generating maps for the computer game doom. I’ve been maintaining WadC for about 12 years and in that time I’ve built lots of small test maps and a few larger, complete ones.

                          It’s like LOGO, but with demons and shotguns.

                          https://jmtd.net/wadc/

                          Complete example: https://redmars.org/wadc/examples/#_birds_wl

                          I also reimplemented much of WadC in Haskell, but it’s quite rudimentary

                          https://github.com/jmtd/liquorice

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                            It’s more math than programming, but I get a blast when I play with small formulas that generate fancy textures. Not necessarily “fractals” : you can obtain quite a lot of stuff just by applying linear convolution to a white noise image. By carefully choosing the distribution of the white noise, the shape of the convolution kernel, and the color palette, you have a huge space of textures to explore.

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                              ThoughtWorks Arts is a whole lab dedicated to combining technology and art. (It’s part of ThoughtWorks the consultancy.) They also hold open calls [currently closed] for residencies.

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                                Yep. I never got very good at it, but I definitely played with Processing as a teenager, mostly messing around with circles or ellipses and the like.

                                I’ve also done some work with video games that sometimes ends up looking artistically cool

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                                  I made a neat project inspired by 0x40hues, built on HTML5 canvas and vanilla JS. Used it for a local event where people bring their own projectors and throw neat stuff up on the side of a museum.

                                  I was bummed out because there was somebody else there doing a computer-based project and they wouldn’t talk about their techniques at all…I’ve noticed that with somebody else from digital events. Seems like those artists have a different culture of explaining how to do stuff than programmers. :(

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                                    I have a twitter bot that generates images every five hours: https://twitter.com/bit_loom

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                                      Wow that’s pretty cool what did you use to generate the art By the way i had the similar idea

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                                        The code is linked in the Twitter profile. It’s written in Common Lisp. I made a little drawing protocol so I can output the same result as PNG (for twitter) or SVG (to plot with an AxiDraw) using various libraries.

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                                      I’ve worked with an artist called Carlo Zanni a few times in the past http://www.zanni.org/ .

                                      A few cool programming projects I recall were http://zanni.org/wp/index.php/portfolio/mycountry/ a poem auto generated with google scribe (it had several versions as suggestions changed every day). Php + js

                                      Another one involved changing signs on photos based en data from internet http://zanni.org/wp/index.php/portfolio/5thday/ c#

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                                        I’ve written code for wearables ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aLzSmpz35Ac ).

                                        The three axis accelerometer and compass sensor returned values from -8000 to +8000, but normal use only gave values in ranges like +500 to +700. So I learned how to use exponential decay to scale the x,y,z inputs to the 0-255 r,g,b color outputs.

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                                          That’s so sickk

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                                          I’ve created a scheme-like language for generating art: https://seni.indy.io/

                                          It has syntax for specifying which parts of the code can vary, and a system that uses genetic algorithms then generates variations.

                                          This is a personal project that I’ve been working on for a few years, originally implemented in JS, then C (via wasm) and currently in Rust (via wasm)