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    Current known companys hosting links to illegal content:

    Fedora Project - sks keyserver
    OpenSUSE - sks keyserver
    MIT - sks keyserver
    communityrack.org - sks keyserver

    there are alot more i have not checked but these are the easy to spot one so far

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      What content is illegal in this case?

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        the magnet links, if you look at the cases of kickass torrent and any other entity that hosted these links, they where taken down and pulled through the legal system with prejudice. If this continues they will not treat key servers any different, especially when they are seen to do nothing about it. There is no good outcome for this.

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          A magnet link is just a hash with tracker URLs appended. What torrent websites did was host the trackers themselves, which is probably a bit different.

          That said, I’m pretty sure they would be treated the same way in the legal system. It might be hard to make a distinction between distributing a file hash and distributing a list of computers with the corresponding file.

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            What judiciary – from any country – has ruled that hashes of a file are illegal? Under what jurisprudence is distributing a representation of copyrighted content or its address, but not the consumable content itself, illegal?

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              IANAL and I don’t know of a precedent, but the devil’s advocate would point out that sometimes it’s about the intent. If you have hashes of illegal content, there’s very little you can do with it legally.

              Not quite conspiracy to commit murder, but are there any legal scholars here who can answer this question?

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                IANAL, but it’s quite obvious that otherwise legal objects can be deemed illegal depending on circumstances.

                For example, in many countries alcohol is legal to possess and consume, but the production thereof and sales to minors is restricted. So selling or giving away alcohol to minors is a crime.

                The problem here isn’t the hashes themselves - the (possible) problem is that the service providers (the one’s running the SKS servers) can be deemed responsible for their use in finding and downloading content deemed infringing.

                edit clarification.

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        sooo… use signal?

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          Signal is a messaging app, with a central provider. I would thing something more like Freenet would be ideal for moving PGP keys around. Freenet is slow, but PGP keys are tiny and infrequently downloaded, Freenet tries to maintain availability for a file as long as someone occasionally requests it (even if the original uploader goes away), and a Freenet node operator can’t tell what’s on their machine unless they already know what they’re looking for.

          At least, if the problem you’re trying to overcome is the fact that SKS server operators can be compelled to censor them. Personally, I would think a project like Fedora would prefer to make their SKS server invite-only and only have package maintainers put their keys up there. If Fedora put up a Freenet node, they’d probably be censored by every country that engages in that kind of thing, and I’m not sure if they want to fight that fight.

        2. [Comment from banned user removed]

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            It would be like a specific ntp server going offline. Nobody knows what relies on it, but that thing is now broken.

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              The problem is not servers hosting hashes, it’s anyone who has a problem with that.

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                Making it easier to get illegally distributed content is generally considered bad.

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                  Restricting art and research to only those who can afford to pay for it is generally considered bad.

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                    It depends on if your income depends on people paying for that art and research.