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    This could just as easily be titled “How to get anyone to help make your open source project awesome.”

    If I can’t tell what your project does from its homepage/Github repo, I’m probably not going to try it out. Link to a demo or show some screenshots or something.

    If your project is hard to install or has lots of hidden dependencies, I’m probably going to give up halfway through reading about it. I resisted using Graphite because the setup seemed really daunting.

    If your project has some arcane bug tracking system that makes me jump through hoops of creating an account, waiting for a verification e-mail, filling out captchas, and then filling out tons of form fields just to report a bug, guess what, I’m not going to bother reporting the problem.

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      I agree. It’s important to at the very least provide links to tutorials or project pages for the languages/tools used to develop the project so others can get a development environment setup. I do think this point is more important for designers since more often than not they are unfamiliar with the tools used to build open source projects.

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        I do think this point is more important for designers since more often than not they are unfamiliar with the tools used to build open source projects.

        @b this is exactly what I was getting at in the blog post, but I agree with @jcs that things that make it easier for designers to get involved with a project should make it easier for anyone to get involved.