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    This was an incredible read, even for amateurs in ASM! Thanks!

    You mentioned that at a point, many bots just bombed 0x000, which killed yours. How did they figure out that is a common place to place yourself at?

    After each round, are the “bots” revealed to all participants, so that they can inspect eachothers bot, or is it “blind”, and you just have to anticipate your oponents methods?

    Apologies for the generic language, assembly is not one of my strong points.

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      This was an incredible read, even for amateurs in ASM! Thanks!

      Thank you!

      You mentioned that at a point, many bots just bombed 0x000, which killed yours. How did they figure out that is a common place to place yourself at? After each round, are the “bots” revealed to all participants, so that they can inspect eachothers bot, or is it “blind”, and you just have to anticipate your oponents methods?

      Right, I should’ve included a gif of the gameplay; perhaps, watch a bit of the stream. So, each bot’s actions are fully visualized as colored boxes in a 32 × 32 grid, and the first 3 days of the event are just “practice” rounds—essentially to understand what others are doing and work around it to some degree for the finals (day 4). You improve your submission after each day of play. Anyway, to answer your question, yeah 0x000 is a fairly common position to place your bot at. And no, the bots aren’t “revealed”, technically. It’s on you to reverse engineer other bots by watching their gameplay.

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      Neat!

      Is it possible to play this as a single player game—to practice?

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        Sure thing. You’ll have to provide both bots yourself, though. :) You can find a bunch of example bots here, including all r2con 2020 submissions—practice against these, maybe?