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    Inspiration for this came from LED multiplexing layouts for hand-crafting, posted here about a month ago – thanks for posting it @friendlysock!

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      Oooh, pretty! Good inspiration.

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      From Wikipedia:

      As with any multiplexing, there is a requirement to cycle through the in-use LEDs rapidly so that the persistence of the human eye perceives the display to be lit as a whole. Multiplexing can generally be seen by a strobing effect and skewing if the eye’s focal point is moved past the display rapidly.

      I feel like a sufficiently clever person could make good use of this downside in order to get something akin to subpixel rendering, but for videos. Maybe use inter-frame movement interpolation and update the different parts of the display at different rates in order to convey motion with a higher effective frame rate than you could otherwise get.

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        Yes!! It’s really fun to get outside the assumed constraints that display abstractions are built on. A charlieplexed array with 5 pins / 20 LEDs for example, light each LED for a maximum 5% duty cycle if you want to keep the current consumption within bounds of a microcontroller (one LED on at a time), giving each LED equal time.

        But along the lines of what you’re saying, it’s not actually necessary to give each LED equal time! You could light less LEDs at once to make them brighter for emphasis, or create a PWM scheme that uses the off-time of some LEDs to give extra brightness to others, or yeah, give more cycles to some LEDs that have faster motion, or….

        Stuff gets so neat and interesting when you work a level below the usual assumed abstractions! ✨