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    The problem with these free services is, like all the others, they will get abused and go away, or the poor sysadmin that’s babysitting that thing will get fed up from the overwork of trying to keep the abuse down to a tolerable level.

    I strongly suggest just running your own, it’s not hard, I’m particularly fond of this one: https://github.com/timvisee/send

    Which is Mozilla’s Firefox Send forked and maintained(so far). But others are fine too.

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      Why not just upload it to a secret S3 bucket? A password and an unguessable URL are pretty similar in a scenario like this.

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        I rarely use AWS these days(I used to, but not now), if I forget about the bucket then I get charged like one cent or whatever. Actually it would be cool if S3 offered self-expiring buckets, not sure if it does, or I forgot..

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          If you have an S3 bucket with zero files in it, it doesn’t incur storage charges. You can put a lifecycle rule on an S3 bucket that will automatically expire files after say 30 days.

          In the AWS console, create a new bucket for your temporary files. Open the Management tab. Click “Create lifecycle rule”. Name it “expire after 30 days”, tick the action “Expire current versions of objects”, set “Days after object creation” to 30, tick the action “Permanently delete noncurrent object versions”, set “Days after objects become noncurrent” to a small number like 7 (I can’t remember offhand but this option might not be available if you don’t turn on bucket versioning, which is fine.) Click “Create Rule”.

          You can also make those rules apply only to objects with a specific prefix, so you could have separate folders like “30-days/” and “90-days/” with a different lifecycle rule applied to each if you want to have a couple of different timeouts.

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        I don’t get why you wouldn’t do at least a basic git setup. Init, add, and a single commit when you’re done. Sorry, it’s just one of the first things you mentioned.

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          Of course, I could, but I’ve a lot of work so can’t get to it, also currently I don’t want to maintain a git repo. When you have a git repo, you start getting ideas about workflows, branches, etc etc, it’s too much for this point in time. So maybe people in the same situation as me would find the setup useful.

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            Write the three line script, commit every so often… the power of git to let you undo a mistake is great, and you don’t need to go about setting up some github repo, just use git locally and push to either a client git server or dump as you do now.