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    Stories like this make me glad that, by not depending on a very closed platform like osx, I am not at the mercy of the whims of some vendor regarding support for the hardware I own.

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      I am not convinced that this makes a huge difference. I’ve seen open source operating systems / distros drop support for CPU families or models (e.g. requiring ISA extensions that older CPUs don’t support in the compiler flags for all of their binary packages). When a kernel drops support for 32-bit x86 or 32-bit PowerPC, do you have the expertise to maintain a forward-port of the last supported version? From what I remember, you probably do, but the cost to your time would be more than the cost of a new computer.

      When the package builders stop providing packages for your system, do you have the resources to build them yourself? I have an old PowerPC Mac and building the FreeBSD package set on it would take 1-2 months (and require an external disk). It’s probably not worth it to build those things.

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        While I do understand and can relate to your point, I do still prefer the situation where it is reasonably within the reach of either myself or an interested group of people, to the despair over the powerlessness (pun intended) of not being able to, due to lack of sources and legal barriers.

        As an Amiga owner/enthusiast, I do suffer enough of that, given the generally sad state of Amiga and the ecosystem’s IP.

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        What if Darwin had continued as an open source operating system.

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          I’m not a fan of Darwin, it being Mach-based and all.