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    I’m not a fast thinker, so the argument of recording my screen in order to try to find out how to be faster doesn’t seem to me very helpful. But I understand it’s more about introspection than about the actual screen recording, so any tool that enables a person to be able to perform introspection into the mechanism of the process of one’s thought is a good tool.

    Also, for me, “being a better programmer” means that a person does things that he/she doesn’t want to do. I mean, a programmer does it, because it must be done, not because it’s fun. Writing tests, writing documentation, writing good commit messages, writing good bug descriptions, writing while thinking what it will happen with the project after a few years, shortening the list of dependencies, thinking about the next maintainer of the project, preparing for meetings, those are all traits of a good programmer in my view. Even if a person isn’t able to solve an unsolvable problem, there’s still a massive potential with the person to be a great programmer.

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      Interesting. Thinking of recording my screen scares me. I’m not exactly why.

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        I’ve started using ffmpeg -video_size 3840x2160 -framerate 2 -f x11grab -i :0.0 output.mp4 to save two frames per second at my native screen resolution, any thoughts on how that could be better?

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          This was submitted last year, with no update or new info. Why resubmit it?

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            Perhaps it’s relevant given Dan Luu’s recent post where he talks about some similar techniques.

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            Recording my screen as I write a program. Then reviewing the footage and seeing how I could have written the program faster.

            Is there software that allows you to live-stream programming but blurs out API-key-shaped stuff?

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              There’s a VS Code plugin called Cloak that does this. I haven’t used it though.

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                Note that there’s no need to stream the video for this exercise.

                That said, you could write a little script for your editor or terminal, I suppose. Probably easier to just manually pause/unpause the stream, tho.

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                  Right. That was more a thought inspired by the article than a comment on the article itself.

                  The problem is, of course, that I might accidentally reveal keys.

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                    You can make OBS capture only a specific window. I choose a small Xephyr (i.e. nested X session) window so I know exactly what people will see and what they won’t.

                    I have seen people with special plugins which blocks/blurs windows except for ones which are whitelisted.

                    Other people have hotkeys which swap the stream to a static image.

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                Love this.

                I’m only slightly skeptical about the “recording my screen” tip because I find that the majority of time I’m spending thinking, drawing diagrams, etc., and less time actually writing code. This goes to the author’s point about “spending 5 minutes deciding on an approach up front.” Just do that and you’ll improve tremendously – which is one reason I try to stress design docs as often as possible. No one really reads a design doc after it’s executed, the exercise of writing the doc is the important part.

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                  Also, Code Katas are a great way to improve your craft.

                  Stories with similar links:

                  1. My Approach to Getting Dramatically Better as a Programmer via pushcx 2 years ago | 55 points | 21 comments