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      A great overview of how good it is to finally have laws seeking to protect my data and my privacy. Yes, it is a pain to implement for businesses and developers, but that is a good thing - because it finally forces us to think about private data management and the implications of how it is used. Before GDPR, the default was take as much data as possible, keep it forever, and don’t care about how it is used or if it is leaked.

      If only there was something like this in the USA…

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          I don’t disagree that government surveillance is a bad thing, but that doesn’t make private surveillance magically ok.

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              If two people have cameras in my room, of course I’m going to be glad to get rid of one - that lets me focus my attention on removing the other. Progress is welcome, even when it’s not the end of the fight.

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                  The bottom line is that GDPR doesn’t help at all.

                  Personally, I’d rather want not to be spied on by private, unaccountable organizations than the government, which at least in the west can be reformed to a certain degree. Unless one has a government-paranoia (which in my eyes is a more of an American phenomenon), I believe people see this as an improvement, if only marginal.

                  And ultimately, if it doesn’t “help at all”, as you argue, what’s the problem then?