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    Friendly advice: the way you submitted this makes it feel like an ad, which makes me less inclined to check out your work. I assume you will be advertising your work to other forums so you may want to keep this in mind to maximize your reach.

    In particular, if you take a minute to lurk here you’ll see that generally stories are not submitted with a list of tags longer than the title of the story. It’s like tweeting “Check out my CMS #API #Databases #JavaScript #Mobile”, most people experienced with Twitter will mentally filter this into the spam pile

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      Thanks @cmm – really helpful advice! I intentionally left those links out of the original post since it seemed way too much like self-promotion. Still, I am trying to promote the software… so it’s a difficult balance. And as a comment I assumed it could be downvoted/removed as needed. I’ve tried to stay as objective as possible in my posts (here and elsewhere) but it can be difficult at times since I’m clearly biased. :/

      Also, I noticed I was way off with the number of tags originally submitted (so many seemed applicable!) – glad that was trimmed down by the community. I should have lurked for longer before my first post so I had a better sense of format/tagging… live and learn. Thanks again!

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        Although there’s no requirement to use it, you will probably get better responses in future if you use the show tag when you are linking work that you did. I don’t personally see a clear line between “I thought it would be fun to talk about this cool thing I did” and “this is an ad for my thing”, it’s really about being transparent about it.

        It sounds like you’re engaging with the community and trying to learn the culture here, so I’m sure you’ll do fine. :)

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          Ahh, the show tag is exactly the transparency I was looking for – instead, I used the “this is my work” checkbox on the submission page. Learning curve… thanks!

          Yeah, the tens of people bumping on our GA was not my goal – instead, I’m hoping to get feedback from other devs and tech folk on the framework itself. If we find one person who’s interested in contributing or providing meaningful feedback on the platform then this was well worth it. That’s also why I added more explicit links to our FeatHub/Docs/Slack pages.

          Also, the font and js comments for the marketing site were quite helpful – and already in our repo’s issue tracker!

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            It’s not necessarily an obvious distinction at first, but the “this is my work” checkbox means you wrote the linked article, not necessarily that you built the thing the linked article is about. For example if I wrote an article explaining why I think Pokémon Go was successful and linked it here, I’d check that box (and lobste.rs would then indicate that the article is “by” me), but I wouldn’t tag it show because I didn’t make Pokémon Go.

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              Makes perfect sense now, thanks. Not sure if/how I would go about adding that at this point though. Still, I appreciate everyone being so understanding/helpful with these missteps… makes for a more inviting community than some others I’ve experienced.

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        Let’s not mince words:

        This was an ad submission from a new account made the day prior.

        Slathering a show tag on it as though it was somebody in the community displaying their work is a misnomer–this is advertising spam and shouldn’t be here.

        This @benhaynes user is 2 days old, has only commented on this story, and has only submitted this story. They should be banned.

        Folks, this is a slap in the face to all of the Lobsters that actively participate in this community, lurk, and/or share their cool part-time projects.

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          Hey @angersock – normally I would ignore a narrow-minded comment such as yours, but these accusations have struck a nerve. I’ve personally spent innumerable hours and absurd amounts of money over the past twelve years building this free and open-source software for the developer community. I get nothing in return other than the fulfillment of working on a project that I truly believe in. So, let’s be clear about my intentions…

          Yes, I wrote this post directly after finding and being invited to the Lobsters community. The explicit purpose of the post was to raise awareness and gather feedback for the software my team has created. Unlike you, I’ve used my real name for my handle and have made no attempt to hide the fact that this is indeed my project. I sought further transparency by marking myself as the “author” of the URL – unaware of the show tag.

          What is the purpose of this site if not to share useful tech/dev resources with the community? Is there a certain period of time you’re supposed to lurk before interacting? As I am new to the community (also, no secret) and have clearly overlooked some hidden rulebook, I will gladly concede to removing this post (and my account) if that’s the consensus. In fact, if the community agrees with your view that sharing a free and open-source resource is a “slap in the face”… then I certainly don’t belong here at all.

          Otherwise, I happily await any feedback/criticism regarding the actual framework from anyone interested in a more meaningful discussion.

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            Before I go any further, I do want to say that you have a very nice site, and a product that looks like it’ll be handy and useful for people who are its target audience. It has nice polish, and the docs look like a helpful start even if they are a little rough in styles in some places.

            I don’t want to imply you have a bad product–but your appearance and actions here are part of an overall trend in technical communities that is harmful.

            ~

            I’ve personally spent innumerable hours and absurd amounts of money over the past twelve years building this free and open-source software for the developer community.

            That’s great! I’ve spent many many hours working on client work and employer work, and I never talk about it here! Your allocation of resources is just that, your allocation of resources. It doesn’t automatically grant you any more a right to be here than Larry Ellison or Crazy Larry.

            I get nothing in return other than the fulfillment of working on a project that I truly believe in

            Right from your navbar. You’re not being entirely honest by claiming otherwise.

            Yes, I wrote this post directly after finding and being invited to the Lobsters community. The explicit purpose of the post was to raise awareness and gather feedback for the software my team has created.

            So, by your own admission, you didn’t watch this place, but immediately found and joined it without lurking to observe the cultural norms. This was advertising on our board. You didn’t do this to help other devs, to solve our problems, or to explore solution spaces, but explicitly to hawk your wares.

            I get it, you’re with a PHP agency and you all have to do massive hustle to stay relevant and marketable. You have to show new (free but consulting-friendly) products to drum up support work in Ye Grande Open Source Model. That’s totally awesome, but here isn’t the place to do it.

            Unlike you, I’ve used my real name for my handle and have made no attempt to hide the fact that this is indeed my project.

            Some of us benefit from a bit of anonymity. If I wanted to put my real name next to everything, I’d be on Facebook. Other users here doubtless feel the same, and you’re kind of out of line acting otherwise. Of course, you’d know this if you had spent time on the site before posting.

            I sought further transparency by marking myself as the “author” of the URL – unaware of the show tag.

            This is good, props and no complaints–except that the show tag is intended for functioning community members. There are a handful of cases I can think of where a user almost immediately posted a project, but again, those were projects and not products.

            What is the purpose of this site if not to share useful tech/dev resources with the community? Is there a certain period of time you’re supposed to lurk before interacting?

            Both fair questions.

            The purpose of the site is always evolving, but content tends towards “Here’s information that will help a developer program something better or engineer something more reliably”. This is somewhat distinct from “Here’s a product that you can use to do your job and you can optionally pay for it”. Your submission is a turnkey tool, and it’s our bad for not having a tool tag to help mark that.

            We don’t want to become another marketing channel and dumping ground for advertisements. Any individual product team has nothing to lose from posting under such circumstances, but it rapidly destroys the signal-to-noise ratio in a forum like this.

            If you wanted to lurk, I’d suggest a week or two just to see what kinds of articles pop up and how people react. It’s a slow-moving board, mostly because it isn’t constantly inundated with people trying to sell their company’s products (the stream.io folks notwithstanding).

            Otherwise, I happily await any feedback/criticism regarding the actual framework from anyone interested in a more meaningful discussion.

            Please understand–for you this is just another chance to get users for your product and free QA work. For us, this is where we talk to each other without the din of people hawking their wares (that’s HN). Have some respect that you might be called out on that as you were here.

            Edit: fix spelling and typo.

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              Thanks for the reply, hopefully by understanding each other’s positions we can conclude this particular thread of comments. It’s getting complex, but I’ll respond to each of your points for the sake of completeness.

              Before I go any further, I do want to say that you have a very nice site, and a product that looks like it’ll be handy and useful for people who are its target audience. It has nice polish, and the docs look like a helpful start even if they are a little rough in styles in some places. I don’t want to imply you have a bad product–but your appearance and actions here are part of an overall trend in technical communities that is harmful.

              I truly appreciate that. I think the docs are still a bit lacking and need to be normalized – but it’s a slow process and sometimes framework changes happen faster than I can write/rewrite docs.

              That’s great! I’ve spent many many hours working on client work and employer work, and I never talk about it here! Your allocation of resources is just that, your allocation of resources. It doesn’t automatically grant you any more a right to be here than Larry Ellison or Crazy Larry.

              I don’t doubt that you (or other people here) have! I think you’re understandably mistaken regarding my relationship to this software… so a little background:

              I have been a freelance dev my entire adult life, 12 years ago I started Directus as a side-project thinking it would be useful in my workflow, and made it open source because: why not. I alone concepted/designed/programmed the first 5 versions over almost a decade. No contributors, no funding, nothing corporate about it. Then I started a small dev shop in 2011 – and shifted Directus under that agency in an attempt to substantiate it in a congested field. I posted in forums exactly like this one and received feedback that the idea was great but the codebase itself was sub-par (I went to school for design and will be the first to admit my self-taught coding has its limitations). So, still believing in the platform, I paid my employees to rebuild it properly in backbonejs, funded by our other projects.

              Now, a few years later, Directus is still my side project – I work on it every night after work and still try to gather feedback in community discussions on my weekends :/ . The entire Directus team is myself and my one (lead) developer who is similarly impassioned. This is not some “get rich” service my huge agency dreamed up – it’s a very personal project that I am trying to improve. And in my eyes, the best way to improve it is to get more people to use, critique, and contribute to it.

              Right from your navbar. You’re not being entirely honest by claiming otherwise.

              Correct, there is a Hosted side to the software. My dev and I created it a few months ago to try and offset the absurd costs of the project in hopes of being able to continue to afford working on it. It in no way even comes close to covering my expenses, and if it ever turns a profit, that money would only get put back into more dev/support. If I wanted to link to the pay side I would have posted the directus.io URL – though I understand how commingled these two are.

              So, by your own admission, you didn’t watch this place, but immediately found and joined it without lurking to observe the cultural norms. This was advertising on our board. You didn’t do this to help other devs, to solve our problems, or to explore solution spaces, but explicitly to hawk your wares. I get it, you’re with a PHP agency and you all have to do massive hustle to stay relevant and marketable.

              Correct, I posted immediately. I’m being honest in that I don’t have time to deeply engrain myself in every web community before contributing. But, please don’t presume my intentions. Respectfully, this is a tiny site with very little traffic (comparatively) – I came here because I knew it wouldn’t be some huge marketing thing. We still have a few small bugs/issues in the code/ux… I came here to get opinions and feedback from other developers before moving into a marketing phase.

              Also, we’re not a PHP agency (ugh, these assumptions!). Our work is extremely varied and we can’t solve every problem with the same language/frameworks. I actually pushed for Node, as I loved the idea of the entire framework being js. But Node was a bit younger (and unproven) then, and with limited resources I had to work with what I had available. And as an aside, I have never hustled or advertised my agency – we’ve remained relevant and profitable by communicating well and providing quality work… not sure why you’re so intent on thinking the worst.

              You have to show new (free but consulting-friendly) products to drum up support work in Ye Grande Open Source Model. That’s totally awesome, but here isn’t the place to do it.

              I don’t even know what you’re trying to say here.

              Some of us benefit from a bit of anonymity. If I wanted to put my real name next to everything, I’d be on Facebook. Other users here doubtless feel the same, and you’re kind of out of line acting otherwise. Of course, you’d know this if you had spent time on the site before posting.

              Are you saying I’m “out of line” for using my own name? That’s my choice the same as anon is yours. Just pointing out that I am not trying to hide anything. But please, it’s the internet – I don’t need to spend time on this site to know that most users don’t want to use their real name.

              This is good, props and no complaints–except that the show tag is intended for functioning community members. There are a handful of cases I can think of where a user almost immediately posted a project, but again, those were projects and not products.

              Directus is my project. Anything can be a product if you’re selling it. Feel free to call it a product if you want (it does have a Hosted version) but you should take my comments here in context… does this conversation seem like a marketing ploy? If this were an ad I would have not responded to comments and either abandoned or deleted the post when the comments derailed.

              Also, I maintain that this is the internet, people do what they want. If you want to make a rule that you can’t post in your first X days… then add a conditional to the site. Otherwise, stop citing invisible lurk/post ratios.

              Both fair questions. The purpose of the site is always evolving, but content tends towards “Here’s information that will help a developer program something better or engineer something more reliably”. This is somewhat distinct from “Here’s a product that you can use to do your job and you can optionally pay for it”. Your submission is a turnkey tool, and it’s our bad for not having a tool tag to help mark that. We don’t want to become another marketing channel and dumping ground for advertisements. Any individual product team has nothing to lose from posting under such circumstances, but it rapidly destroys the signal-to-noise ratio in a forum like this. If you wanted to lurk, I’d suggest a week or two just to see what kinds of articles pop up and how people react. It’s a slow-moving board, mostly because it isn’t constantly inundated with people trying to sell their company’s products (the stream.io folks notwithstanding).

              Maybe it’s just your subjectivity, but the post was intended for: “Here’s information that will help a developer program something better or engineer something more reliably”. If you don’t understand the framework, or don’t want to use it, fine. But that doesn’t preclude other devs here needing to manage a custom-schema database… this is a great tool for them. The rest of your comment still assumes I’m here to sell something – I’ve covered that and will move on.

              Please understand–for you this is just another chance to get users for your product and free QA work. For us, this is where we talk to each other without the din of people hawking their wares (that’s HN). Have some respect that you might be called out on that as you were here.

              I hope that by this point you see the dichotomy in simply posting a link. You can say it’s me just “hawking wares” all day, I can say I’m here to get feedback – arguing either side won’t do much.

              Let’s say I was here for a few weeks first, the only difference in my post would have been using the show tag instead of the ~8 tags I chose. That’s it. The only way to have a discussion about this software without you thinking it was an ad would have been to not include the link. Something like: “Hey, I created a framework over the past decade and would love to use this comment section for feedback dialog, but I can’t link to it or say the name because you’ll think I’m here to sell it to you.” A bit absurd.

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                Thanks for the reply. Some nits and clarifications:

                Also, we’re not a PHP agency (ugh, these assumptions!).

                From your careers page…you are hiring PHP backend devs. And your submission here was a PHP framework. That’s why I feel justified in having calling your place a PHP dev shop, at least until you provided additional background information.

                I don’t even know what you’re trying to say here.

                The business models that most open source projects with a commercial bend seem to follow these days are to give away the software and offer better hosting (Postgres, Wordpress, etc.) or to give away the software and offer consulting services when things go wrong or when people want to use the tech but don’t want to learn it.

                Key to that kind of business is drumming up visibility and support for those products, whether or not the product is actually a good fit for many use cases (Docker, Cassandra, npm, etc.). It is that marketing that is often most harmful/polluting to communities like this, and your post here seemed to be that sort of thing in the small.

                If this were an ad I would have not responded to comments and either abandoned or deleted the post when the comments derailed.

                It depends, right? Some very successful campaigns have been waged on HN and other places by engaging with commentors and using that to signal responsiveness or expertise. For example, in this subthread you’ve been able to tell the backstory on this product and why it exists and how much your company cares about it–and if that can’t be used to encourage adoption I’d be surprised.

                Let’s say I was here for a few weeks first, the only difference in my post would have been using the show tag instead of the ~8 tags I chose. That’s it.

                And then I would’ve looked at your post, and made the same complaints. Here’s what you could’ve done that would’ve made this whole thing less annoying for community folks:

                • Linked to a code repo instead of a polished product page. As the @cmm pointed out, your submission initially looked a lot like any of a dozen product pages we see submitted on other sites every day. Showing code first would’ve made you seem less opportunistic.
                • Contributed to the community prior to submitting your product. If you simply lurked for a few weeks, didn’t comment, didn’t submit any content that would’ve been interesting otherwise, and then posted this, you’d still be in the wrong. The point of the show tag is for community members to show their cool stuff. If you aren’t participating in the community by commenting or submitting things, you haven’t shown that you have any investment here, and hence we should be pretty skeptical when you pop up and use us as a test audience.
                • Submitted a blog post that could’ve taught us something about the technology behind your product. It still would be the annoying content marketing that I hate, but at least a writeup on problems you have migrating to Backbone or whatever could’ve educated somebody.

                We’d love to have you here, but you need to actually show that you are interested in us as something beyond a focus group.

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                  From your careers page…you are hiring PHP backend devs. And your submission here was a PHP framework. That’s why I feel justified in having calling your place a PHP dev shop, at least until you provided additional background information.

                  ?

                  The business models that most open source projects with a commercial bend seem to follow these days are to give away the software and offer better hosting (Postgres, Wordpress, etc.) or to give away the software and offer consulting services when things go wrong or when people want to use the tech but don’t want to learn it. Key to that kind of business is drumming up visibility and support for those products, whether or not the product is actually a good fit for many use cases (Docker, Cassandra, npm, etc.). It is that marketing that is often most harmful/polluting to communities like this, and your post here seemed to be that sort of thing in the small.

                  ?

                  It depends, right? Some very successful campaigns have been waged on HN and other places by engaging with commentors and using that to signal responsiveness or expertise. For example, in this subthread you’ve been able to tell the backstory on this product and why it exists and how much your company cares about it–and if that can’t be used to encourage adoption I’d be surprised.

                  ?

                  And then I would’ve looked at your post, and made the same complaints. Here’s what you could’ve done that would’ve made this whole thing less annoying for community folks…

                  ?

                  We’d love to have you here, but you need to actually show that you are interested in us as something beyond a focus group.

                  ✌️

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              I personally think your post is fine. Sorry for derailing with the post about the way you posted it here, but if I didn’t do it someone else would have, and I figured if I did it I could at least be nice/constructive about it and potentially preempt any anger. Looks like that didn’t work.

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                Haha, no problem! Your post was quite helpful in my Lobster onboarding ;)

                People are protective of spaces like this in an attempt to keep them true to their roots – I respect that. Some people just need to calm down (or grow up) in their approach.

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                  Some people just need to calm down (or grow up) in their approach.

                  This is both wrong and passive-aggressive:

                  • You mean @angersock.
                  • “calm down (or grow up)” is patronizing.

                  In my opinion, @angersock went over the line with “slathering” and “this @benhayes user”. But the feedback was clear and impersonal. I stress impersonal. Obliquely telling someone to “grow up” a personal attack.

                  As much as you took the feedback posted personally because, as you said, you’ve “personally spent innumerable hours and absurd amounts of money over the past twelve years,” recognize @angersock and others have personally spent innumerable hours, etc. building this community.

                  I often strongly disagree with @angersock, but I recognize he has put a lot in here. Perhaps, as a new guest here, you could respect the same?

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                    Yes, I did mean @angersock – I assumed that was intrinsically clear based on the comment thread itself. And I stand by my “calm down or grow up” statement, here’s why:

                    His tone was accusatory, his temper short, and the whole comment exaggerated – I taught kids for years, it seemed childish to me. It was a call to gather the pitchforks over an innocuous post that, if more calmly written could have been useful. He also could have spoken to me directly, asking me to leave for X reasons, but instead tried to create a call to arms to delete my post and ban me… that seems personal.

                    I didn’t say @angersock hasn’t put in serious work on projects – I would expect that nearly everyone on this site is/has created projects over long periods of time that they are proud of and want to share (including this site). I was simply trying to explain that Directus is not some corporate service I’m pushing, but is in fact one of those same intimately personal projects that I am proud of and wanted to share. He said the site is here to “share their cool part-time projects”… and that is precisely what I came here to do.

                    It’s a lack of understanding of me and my project that caused this argument – exacerbated by my being new to the community. Hopefully you can understand my confusion and frustration that I’ve now spent the entirety of my time here defending a post that should not have to be defended instead of discussing the merit of the software itself.

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                      I empathize. I’ve been in the same place. Respectfully: responding to an uncharitable post with an uncharitable post isn’t helpful. Concretely: @angersock wasn’t talking to you.

                      It’s your choice to defend yourself. Forums will suck infinite energy, if you let them.

                      I look forward to your future contributions to our community.

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                        He also could have spoken to me directly, asking me to leave for X reasons, but instead tried to create a call to arms to delete my post and ban me… that seems personal.

                        Nothing personal about it–you just happened to be a good example of folks who aren’t from the community joining just to try and drop something on the community without engagement. I would’ve done the same whether it’d been you, Paul Graham, or the Pope.

                        I’ve now spent the entirety of my time here defending a post that should not have to be defended instead of discussing the merit of the software itself.

                        Come now, that’s not even true in this thread, in recent memory.

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                          Nothing personal about it–you just happened to be a good example of folks who aren’t from the community joining just to try and drop something on the community without engagement. I would’ve done the same whether it’d been you, Paul Graham, or the Pope.

                          Rallying for my banishment still feels personal – though I understand for you this is more of a SSDD scenario ;)

                          Come now, that’s not even true in this thread, in recent memory.

                          Very true! And while the marketing site is clearly important, I’m hoping to hear what people think (good, bad or indifferent) about the actual software. I’d ask what you think, but you’ve been clear that this is not the type of platform you like/want to use.

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            What exactly is a headless CMS? I checked project’s page and I couldn’t understand

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              We just added a section describing this on the marketing site, but it might not be altogether clear.

              A headless (or decoupled) CMS is one that only manages content, as opposed to most “CMS” out there now that overreach by managing your views/templates/logic/routing/etc. So while most “CMS” are built specifically for websites (only), a headless CMS can manage data for anything (native apps, content syndication, interactive walls, etc)… in fact it can manage content for MULTI-client projects where you may have an app, widget, and website all using the same content.

              Since the content is decoupled from the application/view you access your data through an API or SDK. For Directus, you can use our API, one of our language SDKs, or just connect to the database directly however you’d like.

              I hope that makes sense! If so, maybe I should look into using a description like this on Marketing. ;)

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                I would argue that most CMS systems aren’t built specifically for websites, but that most people simply don’t have as expansive a definition of CMS as you do.

                For example, I use Google Docs as a “headless CMS” and have done so for years. I never would have thought about it that way, it’s just a content editor that I can:

                • Consume using curl
                • Publish using an API either by pulling from the document (using google app script) or from my app (using the google RPC/API)
                • Share with externals (customers, contractors, etc) tracking changes and commenting using familiar interfaces
                • Chart my data for quick and dirty visualisations
                • Edit: Offline (airplane) editing, mobile editing (e.g. from an iPhone)

                I focus mostly on sheets, but I also use docs and presentations this way. I find it extremely convenient and have very little issues by-way of training people how to use these tools.

                I would love to have something that does this that isn’t Google, but I appreciate that it’s very ambitious and there are other things I care more about doing than things that Google is already doing…

                I hope your app matures and becomes real competition in this space, but I worry that by inventing a new term, you believe that the marketplace for “headless CMS” is nascent, and that the very small feature set you have focused on will be compelling. It isn’t, and I don’t say that to discourage you, but in the hopes it will actually encourage you to make something great – and to give you an idea what that something great might look like.

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                  Quite true. I do take Content Management System a bit literally, but only because Directus existed for a decade before “Headless CMS” was coined, and describing the differences with common CMS was difficult. My go to description used to be: “Imagine being able to just give a safe/intuitive PHPMyAdmin to your clients for managing content.”

                  I agree, until reading your comment I wouldn’t have even thought about Google Spreadsheets/Docs as headless CMS… though they effectively are. In fact, earlier versions of Directus actually used editable spreadsheets as the interface – and could save to Filemaker, CSV, Access, etc. The trouble came when graduating to larger, more complex schemas with deeper relational data and media. Still, I try to keep Directus as 1:1 with the database as possible… avoiding the proprietary whenever possible.

                  And while I don’t think that the adoption of a term necessarily implies more potential in the marketplace, I do believe that this style of CMS (regardless of what you call it) is very important for the native apps and installation based projects that are now quite ubiquitous. There are, almost literally, a million options for CMS out there… but I still don’t see any other choices if you just want a safe and client-friendly interface for a raw/custom SQL database. I’ve built sites for companies that require such fine-tuned database architectures that anything else wouldn’t have been performant. Niche or not, I’ve found Directus to be very useful in nearly all my projects… and am still learning how/why other developers agree and disagree.

                  Thank you for the insightful reply!

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              For those interested in learning more or supporting the framework, here are a few other links. Also, we’ve been building this for over 10 years and are happy to answer absolutely any questions you might have, or just listen to your feedback. We’re making this for you…

              • FeatHubFor requesting (or voting on) new features
              • Official DocsTerminal friendly GitHub repo for docs ;)
              • TwitterFor updates and new feature alerts
              • Slack ChannelOur group chat – message me with your email for an invite!
              • DigitalOcean SuggestionsWe’re trying to get Directus added as a one-click install on our favorite server provider
              • Directus HostedHosted DBaaS service for a hassle-free demo (just message me for 2 free months)
              • Pull RequestsIf you’re interested in creating modular javascript UIs let us know – compensation awaits!
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                inb4 complaints that the landing page doesn’t work with javascript and custom fonts turned off.

                (Very pretty site though)

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                  Oddly enough the site is VERY readable in w3m.

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                    It works well enough with everything turned off to at least find the github link. If you just scroll down.

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                      oh jeez – is that a big thing here? To each their own I suppose…

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                        It is with certain people here who do everything in a terminal, or who disable that stuff for security reasons. As you say, to each their own. :)

                        At least the user who constantly complained about sites not being accessible through Tor isn’t here anymore, though he was banned for other reasons than just that.

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                          Can’t argue with security! But some things are made for browsers, some for Terminal… those in favor of the latter can always head directly to GitHub ;)

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                          For accessibility reasons, overriding fonts specifically is rare but very important to some users. It does break most of the web, so you’re in good company…

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                            A very good point – this has been added into our issue tracker… we aspire to deliver a better (more accessible) experience than most of the web! :)

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                              Little late, but good for you! Thanks for making the web a better place :)

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                          inb4 “inb4 on lobste.rs”