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    This really resonates with me, especially all the bits about who you expect to meet in larger orgs and the pathologies of those entities w.r.t. how they pigeonhole their people.

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      I started out post-uni at a 150+ developer company, and while it didn’t suffer from all of the issues listed here, the company culture, and how rigid everything was, turned me off from that kind of structure. It was also a crazy realization, to me, that I would actually rather take a pay cut and work at a smaller company.

      The pros at working at a smaller company is that you have a much bigger opportunity to take responsibility and grow in new areas (whether within development or cross-departmental) and carve out your own space. But the trade-off is, in most cases, a lower pay.

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        I guess $BIGCO was MSFT (LinkedIn), although it looks like he left for a few months then mysteriously returned for a few months before leaving again! In case any of you haven’t seen this amusing but deadly accurate comic about Big Tech: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e1/%22Org_charts%22_comic_by_Manu_Cornet.png

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          Sounds exactly why I’ve yet to work for a BIGCO. :/

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            so you decided to work at salesforce instead…

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              By necessity, roles at $BIGCO are logically separated. By learned habit, gatekeeping between worlds is rampant. Ironically, this sort of cross functional work is highly valued, but if you’re drawn to this path, you’ll find yourself doing much more cutting through red tape than real work.

              Ugh.

              And one of the few acceptable ways many companies allow you to push cross-functional work is by making standards and developing process and even if you’re doing good things you’re still accreting more layers.

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                Sometimes it isn’t habit, but regulation. I can not push to production at my job, and the team that can won’t do it without appropriate managerial sign-offs.