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    I’m not so sure about this; for example for Ruby it adds stuff like /tmp and /pkg, /doc, etc. I often put documentation in /doc and had no idea this is somehow a “reserved” path? The Python is even worse, as it adds stuff like var/, target/, parts/. Any directory anywhere named like that will be excluded.

    I’ve been massively confused by an overzealous gitignore file more than once, and have taken a much more conservative approach since, adding just what’s needed for the project in the most strict way possible (e.g. /progname instead of progname, since otherwise /tests/progname will also be excluded).

    I’m not a big fan of putting exclude rules for 16 different editors in there either. It makes it harder to see the actually important stuff.

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      I’m not a big fan of putting exclude rules for 16 different editors in there either. It makes it harder to see the actually important stuff.

      This is one of the bigger issues I have with typical .gitignore files I see. I’d rather have people who need that set up a global gitignore file local to their machine.

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        It makes it harder to see the actually important stuff.

        Like what? A gitignore file is something I don’t think need that much maintenance.

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          Like “surprise ignores” mentioned in the first two paragraphs.

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        Nice idea, but just playing around with for a minute I noticed 2-3 oddities

        • clicking inside the textfield, a horizontal scrollbar appears
        • Back button needlessly breaks the site. Enter “C”, accept -> create -> forward -> back -> Can’t click Create anymore
        • http://gitignore.io/api/phpstorm is just weird. Everyone I know simply put .idea/ and everything was fine, no need for 50 lines
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          http://gitignore.io/api/phpstorm is just weird. Everyone I know simply put .idea/ and everything was fine, no need for 50 lines

          Interestingly enough, it seems their gitignore collection is based on two templates, the regular one you mention, and a “all” version that does what you mention. I’m guessing that there’s something something with JetBrains, that it might make sense to share some files? I don’t know.

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          I’m surprised someone spent (and is continuing to spend) time and money on this.

          A .gitignore file is a text file. I can’t think of anything simpler than a text file.

          What is the ROI for adding machinery to this?

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            It’s simple, but if I want to quickly set up a new project, having a service to quickly generate such a file (that I can simply forget) is quite nice. Has nothing to do with the complexity of a gitignore file.

            What is the ROI for adding machinery to this?

            ???

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              I’m not sure what’s not clear about my question. A programmer’s time is very expensive. It is completely wild that over 800(!) commits have gone into a project that may save you, what, at most five minutes at the beginning of a project?

              It’s just madness.

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                Looking at the log, most of the commits are updating the submodule, that in turn is mostly merge requests. It’s seems like a neat idea, and just because you claim “A programmer’s time is very expensive”, doesn’t mean something like this is haram.

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                  You say “you claim” as if I’ve said something controversial. It’s no secret that programming is one of the best jobs one can have in terms of remuneration.

                  I also have not suggested that a frivolous project like this is forbidden. I don’t know why you chose to use the word “haram” — literally nothing here has any relation to Islam.

                  I just think it’s a poor use of anyone’s time, because it’s unlikely any time has actually been saved, and it’s not as if downloading a command-line tool or using any web API has made this process any simpler.

                  For reference, here’s a handy chart.

                  https://xkcd.com/1205/