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    This is really cool!

    I recently hacked together an image-based snapshot test thingy, but I used iimage-mode so that the outputs can appear next to their inputs in the source (example). It works nicely for my use case, but it really falls down exactly in the situation you’re describing – when a lot of images change at once.

    You’ve inspired me to make a bulk-side-by-side compare thingy. I think it would be easier if there were two side-by-side buffers with locked scrolling, one with the all of the old images and one with all of the new, so you could quickly scan over all of them for mistakes. I feel like I’d make a mistake with the y/n at some point. But I haven’t tried it, so that might not be true in practice.

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      I used iimage-mode so that the outputs can appear next to their inputs in the source (example).

      Ah neat. I didn’t think of inline display. Btw, just saw your post from the screenshot, and in there… “But by sprinkling a little bit of Emacs fairydust on it…” Similar goal, different language, same dust :)

      You’ve inspired me to make a bulk-side-by-side compare thingy. I think it would be easier if there were two side-by-side buffers with locked scrolling

      Ah yeah. That may work.

      I feel like I’d make a mistake with the y/n at some point.

      Hasn’t happened yet, but I’m hoping versioning control somewhat safeguards things (by me taking a last look before committing).

      ps. Pretty sure I used iimage before to render inline images from eshell.