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Andela is an interesting company anyways - but the new interest in data structures from ICE is a peculiar development.

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    News like this makes me lose faith that the USA is salvageable. In what universe is this making people safer?

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      If it’s good enough for Google, why not for ICE?

      Seriously, though, reading through the comments it looks like it’s par for the course to test someone’s knowledge on their claimed profession. Here’s a comment from one of the users:

      Had the same experience 12 years ago: admitted I am developing linux device drivers, and had to explain differences between kernel 2.4 and 2.6 APIs. The guy actually understood it.

      Testing occupational expertise is not a bad way to find people who are lying. To be able to explain the difference between kernel 2.4 and 2.6 APIs or how to balance a binary search tree are questions one could not possibly answer without actually being in that profession.

      Let’s say you’re a hitman travelling to Malaysia to take out the estranged brother of a dictator. Before you go, you’re given a fake passport and character sheet telling you your profession, your family situation, etc. It’s pretty easy to answer questions like “how long have you been working as a photographer?” or “how did you meet your wife?” but a lot more difficult to prepare for questions like “What is the best lense for close ups?”

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        Testing occupational expertise is not a bad way to find people who are lying. To be able to explain the difference between kernel 2.4 and 2.6 APIs or how to balance a binary search tree are questions one could not possibly answer without actually being in that profession.

        I know plenty of engineers—for better or worse—who cannot balance a BST without brushing up on interview material. To be denied entry at an airport because you’re unable to answer esoteric CS questions is egregious.

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        This is a joke … right? Why would ICE agents know about BST?

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          a bureaucrat in the system was probably charged with making an authenticity test for programmers. they probably googled “programmer interview questions” and found binary search trees, and printed the answer alongside the question, which is what the ICE agent tried to test against.

          the immigration situation in america is terrifying, but this incident is partially hilarious because our ineffective interview formats for software jobs have leaked out into the mainstream so much that it’s affecting immigration policies.

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          This is not the correct usage of the person tag. Consider law or privacy.

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            Oops. My article got merged with the tweet, I don’t think I can fix it.

            Also, is it possible to un-merge? These are definitely two different stories recounting two separate occurrences. Although the event that happened was similar, it was not the same event.

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              I would rather read the article than the tweet. I disagree with the utility of this particular merge action if someone picked the tweet over the article.