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GitHub Link: http://github.com/curiositry/diaeresis

More about the diaeresis, and why it’s useful, in the New Yorker (one of the few publications that still uses it): http://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/the-curse-of-the-diaeresis

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    I don’t get it. I don’t see any change when I click the “Toggle” checkbox.

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      Hmm … what browser are you using? Unless there’s a horrible bug, it should add a diaeresis to “preeminent” in the default demo text. If it finds a word in the demo text (which you can edit) that should have a diaeresis, it will add it (so “cooperate” becomes “coöperate”, “zoological” becomes “zoölogical”, and so forth).

      You can read more about the diaeresis, and why it’s useful, in the New Yorker — one of the few publications that still uses it.

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        Firefox.latest

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          Ah, I see it, thanks!

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            Hmm, that’s not good. I’m running the latest Firefox (50.0.2) too, on Linux. Are there any errors in the console?

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              Also doesn’t work in the latest Edge.

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                I run Linux, but based on my BrowserStack testing it should work at least on IE 9 through Edge 13 (running on Windows 10).

                Are there any errors in the console? Are you running Edge 38? What version of Windows are you running?

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                  Wait, I had to manually toggle it off then back on, and then it adds them. It won’t automatically do so, which is seemingly implied by the text box.

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                    For the default text, or for text you type in the box?

                    If it doesn’t work on the existing text (preëminent), that’s a bug. If it doesn’t work when you type text into the box until you toggle it, that’s a missing feature: I should make it autorun when the demo textbox looses focus, but I haven’t yet.

                    If it’s the first, I’m guessing it’s related to how bleeding Edge handles DOMContentLoaded events…

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                      Would it be too much to have it run on every change event issued by the text box? That way you’d get to see it as you type.

                      By the way, as a fan of the diaeresis: thank you! I hope my suggestion doesn’t require too much reëngineering. :-)

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                        Thanks @tomjakubowski :)

                        Well, there’s one way to find out; I’ll give it a shot.

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                          I tried running it on each change, but depending on how much text there is and how fast the user’s typing, it can get expensive. So for now the demo runs Diaeresis when the text box looses focus.

                          Let me know what you think :)

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          Naive works, too. I love diaereses.

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            I had to toggle the checkbox of and then on again to make it work. Seems like it ought to just be a button or something that retriggers it. Or that reruns on input into the text field. I wasn’t sure it was working for a while.

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              Me too, I assumed it was broken

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                Good point. It doesn’t autorun on when the contents of the textbox change, but it would be good if it did, and I’ll add that shortly.

                (As I mentioned above, if doesn’t autorun on the default text when you go to the page, that’s a bug; if you tell me your browser + OS combo, I’ll try to reproduce and fix it.)

                EDIT: the demo now autoruns diaeresis when the textbox looses focus. Let me know if you have any suggestions.

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              Interesting. I’ve been trained to type diaereses in Dutch, because it’s a base feature of the language’s spelling (‘ideeën’ is the correct spelling, as is ‘officiëel’ and yes, I’ve encoded the diaereses explicitly in the character). This, in turn, means that it doesn’t look weird to me at all.

              Unfortunately, the latest spellingreform has ordained the hyphen as the indicator to be used in combined wordforms, so that e.g. ‘zeeëgel’ is no longer spelled correctly, but should be written as zee-egel. Yes, this means that semantics do play a part in when to use the diaeresis and when to use the hyphen.

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                “preemtive” did not turn into “preëmtive”.

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                  preemtive

                  Try “preemptive”.

                  (It won’t add a diaeresis to “preemtive” because it’s not in the default dictionary. At the moment it matches full words, and fairly large chunks, to avoid bycatch — it doesn’t convert every vowel pair.)