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OpenStreetview (OSV) is the free and open street level imagery platform designed 100% with OSM and mappers in mind.

Here is a direct link to the project http://openstreetview.org/map/

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    I will be very interested to see how this plays out in Germany and Austria, where Google was effectively unable to run Street View due to privacy regulations which made automatic censorship of the images impossible and manual censorship too expensive.

    Dashboard cameras are already heavily restricted so the police could go after anyone contributing to OSV, but even then I don’t think that a German court has the authority to stop OSM from distributing images already made, even if they were made technically illegally.

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      but even then I don’t think that a German court has the authority to stop OSM from distributing images already made, even if they were made technically illegally.

      Why do you think so? Assuming the server where the images are accessible from will be operated by the OSM foundation, it is the host provider for this information and falls under the German TMG. §10 TMG exempts it from liability if and only if the OSM foundation has no knowledge of the illegal material. As a result, once it has been notified of the illegal material (usually by the person who feels offended), it is obligated to remove it. For the processual details, the OSM Foundation appears to be located in the United Kingdom which (as of now, ahem) is still part of the EU, which greatly faciliates a process for an EU citizen.

      Note: §10 TMG codifies a “notice-and-takedown” procedure. It explicitely does not mean all uploaded content has to be reviewed before publication, which is unfeasable anyway.

      so the police could go after anyone contributing to OSV,

      Rather not the police, which has probably enough to do with other things. More likely people who feel offended by the imagery.

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      Did anybody think about the legal requirements things like this have to fulfill? In Germany (where this article’s examples are taken from), the KUG forbids publication of images of any persons without their (prior) agreement to the publication, unless you fall under one of the listed exceptions. I suspect there are similiar laws in other countries, so you definitely have to “pixelize” any persons you might have on your photo before you upload/publish them. The KUG in Germany is not specific to commercial use, it is applicable to anyone, so it does affect services like this one.

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        I believe they blur the faces and the license plates of the photos. Here is a question from the presentation about the privacy, https://youtu.be/XuGjahx8CFc?t=27m32s. Though I am not sure if blurring is enough for Germany…