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      I think it’s usually because “that’s what work is buying me”.

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        Can anyone show me a laptop that doesn’t lose to a macbook in any of these categories?

        • performance
        • price
        • form factor
        • fit and finish
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          I really like Lenovo X1 Carbon.

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            Very happy with 5th gen x1c. If only I could get 16:10 though…

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            Personally I like the Dell XPS 13 and 15. The 4K screens are really amazing to see in person. You can configure with an i7 processor, optional fingerprint reader, fast SSDs up to 1TB, up to 32GB RAM, touch/non-touch display options, up to 97Wh battery in the ~4.5lb model or 56Wh in the 4lb if you want to go lighter (benchmarks). For ports, it has an SD card slot, 2 USB-A 3.0 with PowerShare, 1 HDMI, and a Thunderbolt 3 (including power in/out).

            I feel they compete in several of the categories and are worth checking out in person somewhere (Frys, etc) if you’re in the market. Just earlier today someone posted a link to this guy’s experience spending a year away from MacOS and he winds up with an XPS 15, which he mostly likes.

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              Too many QA issues to compete with a MacBook. Just check /r/dell.

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                Not a chancee, my favooritee part is the firmwware feature that douboles up my keypressese!

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              I went from a 2011 macbook pro 15” to a thinkpad 460p running kubuntu, its not as flush as the macbook but it beats performance & price for me. Form factor, I should’ve got a 15” again but thats my choice. Fit & finish on the macbook is better but then I can easily remove my battery and get to all the internals of the laptop, so I prefer the thinkpad.

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                I can try, though I am not sure what “fit and finish” means or how to measure it.

                Ignoring that, I would offer up both the Dell XPS 13 or Lenovo X1 Carbon.
                There are reasons to pick one over the other, but for me it was the X1 Carbon for having matte screen.

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                  Fit and finish covers build quality and aesthetics. According to this page it’s an automotive term.

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                  The new Huawei Matebook X?

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                    How about the ASUS ZenBook Pro? I don’t have experience with it, but superficially it’s got very similar form factor and design to a MacBook. Aluminum uni-body and all. And being not-Apple, you obviously get better performance for the price.

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                      Thinkpad P71. Well, except for the form factor (I’d rather get stronger arms than have to compromise on other factors), it beats the Macbook Pro on all fronts.

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                      I’ve run Linux on a Macbook because my employer wouldn’t give me anything else. Reason was: effort of IT team vs my effort of running Linux.

                      But pretty sure my effort was extensive compared to what their effort would have been :)

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                          Yeah, but then you’re stuck with the clunky old macOS rather than a nice modern UI like StumpWM, dwm or i3.

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                        16:10 screen, wide-gamut display, correct ppi (X1C is too low, and the high-res Dells too high).

                        The last ThinkPad (of which I have many) to have a 16:10 screen was T410, which is now 8 years old.

                        Personally, there’s no other modern laptop I’d rather use, regardless of operating system. To me nothing is more important than a good and proper screen.

                        If anybody comes up with a laptop that has a 4:3 screen, I’ll reconsider.

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                          Doesn’t the pixelbook have a nice tall aspect ratio? Ignoring linux compatibility and the fact that it’s a chromebook, I feel like you’d like the hardware.

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                            It does, but tragically it’s ruined by a glossy finish on the screen. I bought one for the aspect ratio and brightness but almost threw it out the window several times in frustration before giving it away.

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                          I don’t think many people buy new Apple hardware with the intention of immediately wiping it and installing Linux.

                          My MBP, for example, is running OSX because I need it (or Windows) to use Capture One photo software. When I upgrade to a new machine I’m going to put Linux on the old one and use it for everything else. I did the same thing with my iMac years ago.

                          I personally still think the build quality of Apple laptops are better than the alternatives. The trackpad in my old MBP, for example, still feels better than the trackpads I’ve used on newer machines from other brands. The performance and specs are less important to me as long as it’s “fast enough” and the build is solid.

                          All that said, I’m not buying any more Apple products because their software quality has completely gone down the toilet the last few years.

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                            In this case I didn’t really have a choice. I had tried asking for a PC before I started this job; but they tried to get me in really fast and provisioned a Mac without even asking me. My boss made up some bullshit about how you have to have them for developers laptops as the PCs the company bought didn’t have the specs (16GB of ram and such). I’m really glad I got Linux booting on it and not have to use it in VMWare (which does limit your max ram to 12GB and doesn’t give you access to the logical HT cores).

                            But yea if it was my personal laptop, I wouldn’t even bother buying a mac to being with. My recent HP had everything supported on it with the latest Ubuntu or on Gentoo with a stock kernel tree right out of the box.

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                              I got given a macbook so I had no choice what laptop to use so I installed linux on it and it works well enough.

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                              Yeesh; hard not to cringe while reading thru it and seeing how reflective the display is in the photos.

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                                Had this discussion recently - decided that I’d actually be willing to pay more for a matte screen, even though the trend seems to be the opposite.

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                                  Same. I have put off buying a new macbook since 2009, because apple doesn’t sell matte screens anymore. Starting to research after-market screen overlays to reduce reflection – this ol’ clunker laptop is starting to die I think.

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                                    2009 was a good year for laptops; after hearing some noises on my 2009 thinkpad I’m starting to think it’s time to build up a stockpile to last out this stupid screen fad.

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                                    I’ve heard that matter screens tend to be less sharp, so having a matte screen will not mesh well with high resolution screens.

                                    Not sure if this is actually true though

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                                      I have a matte filter on just about everything. There’s a certain blur, but it’s minimal. It’s way sharper than a low res screen.

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                                        Any good filter recommendations?

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                                          I just get whatever “PET anti glare” screen protector fits the device. Like $10 for a 3 pack on Amazon?

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                                      I strongly prefer glossy screens, because they are more color accurate, and I don’t use my machine in direct sunlight.

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                                    I put Ubuntu on an old Macbook Pro that I wasn’t using anymore.

                                    Everything worked beautifully except for the trackpad. It was incredibly sensitive. Over the years, I’ve come to test my thumb on the trackpad. OSX was smart enough to ignore it. I couldn’t get Ubuntu to. In addition to that, I couldn’t ever get the trackpad to react anywhere near as well as it worked on OSX.

                                    Too bad, it would have been a nice way to repurpose an old machine.

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                                      Modern libinput is supposed to do palm / thumb rejection. Was it installed?

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                                        Yes, it didn’t work well.

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                                      As someone who runs OS X on unsupported hardware, I applaud this. It’s goofy but hey, if it makes him more productive, go for it.

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                                        I use to run a Hackintosh myself back in the day, running 10.6/Snow Leopard

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                                        been looking for the right linux for my 2012-era 11” macbook air for a while now. mint (so i guess ubuntu really?) has done pretty well for the hardware, including to my surprise making the bluetooth stack work with an external mac trackpad. one of these days i’ll try switching to it as my work laptop for a week and see how good or bad it is.

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                                          I’ve seen this said before, and I can personally endorse it – the best supported linux laptop that I’ve ever used is a mac + vmware fusion (and my last laptop was a dell XPS developer edition that shipped with ubuntu… the wifi was much less reliable, the whole thing made an annoying whine constantly, etc. Prior to that I had various thinkpads going back to an X40, which is probably the only other contender for best supported linux laptop I’ve used. If they had kept the quality at that level, I’d still be buying them…). The idea that flaky external displays and no wifi is considered success is baffling to me!