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    Since I use SyncThing as my primary “cloud storage”, I love to celebrate it a little.

    It syncs my smartphone images to my laptop and it syncs our 60GB family folder full of pictures, music, documents, etc across three machines. Since it is not shared with any company and stays inside our LAN, I can store sensitive data (e.g. tax stuff) in there without worries.

    My big wish would be an encrypted-only remote. Then I could make a deal with a friend to act as each others offsite backup without us being able to see each others data.

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      Then I could make a deal with a friend to act as each others offsite backup without us being able to see each others data.

      I kind of do this with duplicity/S3, by running a daily job on my syncthing stores at a central server (which syncthing syncs everything to). duplicity will do incremental backups and encrypt it with my gpg key before sending it to S3. It’s not as slick as if syncthing did this automagically, but it works well and keeps with the spirit of ‘unix’ (one tool, one purpose, etc, etc)

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      The one thing I want from Syncthing is an easier way to set it up from Salt/Ansible. The current config file mechanism is tricky to get right.

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        Honestly, I’ve never bothered configuring it directly, since the web GUI covers everything I need. It’s basically just

        • installing syncthing,
        • starting the service and
        • connecting it to your other devices

        which (at least for me) is manageable.

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          The only problem is programmatically adding peers, such as the states that bring up my webserver (static content stored in Syncthing for easy use)

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            That’s true, I hope a CLI client will be developed that’s a bit more lightweight and more programmable, for use-cases like these.